Can I Sing?

35-2016-12-29-22-15-02The question above isn’t one regarding my musical ability. I wouldn’t call myself a singer in any real sense, but I can be a moderately useful choral soprano from time to time, got grade 8 in singing when I was in my late teens, and have occasionally sung solos, although that’s all very very rusty these days!

However, I have asked myself that question on a couple of occasions recently, most specifically when I’ve “lost the words” (I’ll do a whole blog post about that at some point, but regular readers will by now have picked up that I have times when I am non-verbal and unable to speak).

The first time I wondered about singing was when I had around 3 hours of lost words while my husband and I were staying in the hotel (see Balancing Act), but by the time I had thought to consider the question my husband was asleep and I decided that wasn’t the moment for the experiment. Picture the scenario – you’ve just fallen asleep after a busy day fetching food and coffee, and you’re suddenly awoken by some sort of noise, and then you have to put your glasses on to read the words your wife is typing to you on her phone to discover that your valuable snooze time has been interrupted to conduct some sort of bizarre singing experiment! I’m barmy, but not quite that barmy!

Anyway, last night I lost the words again. Not really surprising after the week of the cancelled second assessment and all its attendant strife (there was yet another round of telephone calls and crossed wires yesterday afternoon). I gradually observed the feeling, familiar since childhood, of first a sort of sick exhaustion, then being (as I’ve always assumed) simply too tired to talk. I’ve spent my life assuming that everyone gets too tired to talk, and that’s just normal.

Since my husband was out late last night working (there’s a reason I don’t wake him when he’s asleep), I was in the flat on my own, so had the opportunity to try the singing experiment. It wasn’t a sophisticated experiment – there was an old episode of Top of The Pops burbling on the telly, and I thought I’d see what happened if I tried, from my non-verbal state, to sing along.

The answer was this – if I tried to sing with the words of the song, then nothing. Couldn’t do it at all. Like there was no connection, something unplugged (I really do want to try to work out how I can describe all this properly sometime, but for now it’s the best I can do). So I tried without the proper words – just “la la la la la” type of thing. Also nothing. Not a hope.

But if I just forgot about the words and hummed the tune alone. Absolutely fine. Like normal. No problem at all. Just like normal humming. Totally wordless, but all completely intact from a pitch and music point of view.

It really is the actual WORDS that are the issue. I have some sort of circuitry issue with making words. Which is, of course, why social events and conversation are so absolutely exhausting. Even when I’m apparently speaking fluently, I’m working overtime to make that speech, and sometimes I just can’t do it at all.

It’s all very interesting!

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2 thoughts on “Can I Sing?”

  1. I agree! That is very interesting! It’s like when I first learned that people with a stammer usually can sing, because the breathing is organized when you sing. So… when you lose your words, is it like an inability to link between the meaning in your head and the sound (because you can still type in a document, right?). I guess even “lalalala” has some meaning then, something like “insert proper words here”. Intriguing…

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