Pride

Today is, the internet informs me, Autistic Pride Day!

This is another of those things that, until this year, I wasn’t aware existed. Just like autism awareness day / week / month or whatever, I was pretty much oblivious to all of this stuff, just as I was oblivious to the fact that I was, it turned out, autistic!

I really should pay more attention!

I’m really not sure I can claim to be proud to be autistic, since being autistic was an entirely effortless process on my part – all I had to do was be born! The processes that meant I have an autistic brain went on all by themselves without me having to do anything at all – I just existed in the only way I knew how!

I’m not quite sure even that I can be proud of surviving this far while working to survive in a world that turns out to be a bit more challenging for me than it is for many others. I’ve had several times of trying not to survive and my survival through them has been entirely down to luck. I suspect I only coped with such high anxiety levels because, to me, they were just normal!

Neither do I feel that I have yet done anything much else to be proud of, although I’m at least sufficiently aware to know that some of my friends will tell me off and say “Yes, but you do xyz and it’s amazing…” and so on! I’m still working on this bit, and it’s probably the area where I have the most internalised ableism towards myself – I know I haven’t fully dealt with the issues discussed in Expectations Gone and Career Snake!, and that that’s still very much work in progress.

Furthermore, the society in which I live generally measures value in terms of financial success – it’s all very well being told “well, you write a nice blog” or “that was lovely that you played some music”, but if I show up at the checkout in the supermarket and tell them that I’d like to pay for my food with “nice comments”, then I’ll go hungry. The part of me that was brought up to believe that I would earn my own money and be “successful” in that way is still fighting with the part of me that knows just how little I contribute and how I am entirely dependent upon handouts from others to survive. I can’t even claim to be pulling my weight domestically – I don’t raise kids because I couldn’t have them, and my husband does about 90% of the domestic work in the flat!

Anyway, I digress. This is supposed to be about pride. And, perhaps, pride in a rather different sense, but because of the way my mind works it’s going through all sorts of “pride” things and I now have a video clip going through my head that shows a large group of rather handsome lions roaming around a grassland somewhere in what is probably Africa! But I’m not supposed to be blogging about lions!

So, returning to what the day is supposed to mean, it seems that it’s meant to be some sort of celebration of neurodiversity. There are probably marches and things and parties or whatever, that I’m unlikely ever to go to because I’m not really a marching sort of a person – more of a blogging sort apparently!

It also seems that one of the basic tenets of the movement is that neurodiversity in general (and presumably autism in particular) is part of a natural variation in human existence, rather than some deviation from the norm that requires a “cure” (I’m still at a loss as to what people who discuss “curing” autism can possibly mean – it just makes no sense, given that it isn’t an illness or a disease).

It also seems to emphasise the notion of autism as a “difference” rather than a “disability”. I’m still forming my ideas about difference and disability, and still getting to grips with the whole “medical model” and “societal model” thing. I class myself as disabled (and have done for years, ever since it became apparent how my mental health issues affected my functioning), but I’m still trying to figure out to what extent the disabling effects of me being autistic and mentally ill are a result of my inability to function in certain ways and to what extent they are a result of the society in which I live. I haven’t even managed to sort out what bits of my “disability” are down to me being autistic and what bits are the result of mental illness. There’s a lot of work still to do.

The more I think about all this, the more I realise I don’t know, and the more I feel like I’m only just scratching the surface of issues about minority groups, privilege or lack of it, models of disability and so on. I’m a musician and scientist, not a sociologist, and I’m a bit out of my depth at the moment. There is a lot of observation and learning and thinking still to be done before I can really start to analyse it all.

The other basic tenet of the autistic pride / neurodiversity movement seems to be that it is led by autistic people themselves and is not a day for organisations led by non-autistics! This, I really hope, is something that will prosper. It’s so true that so much autism research and so on is still led by non-autistics and that there is still such a long way to go in really understanding (as I discovered at the recent conference) what it’s like to live as an autistic person in a world that is, for want of a better expression, distinctly sub-optimal for our neurology!

Of course, given the situation I’m now in, I’m actually rather fascinated to discover what it might be like NOT to be autistic – I feel, to a large extent, that I’m just me and always have been, and what I actually discovered when I found out I was autistic was not that I was different, but that 90+% of the rest of the world was different! From my perspective my autism diagnosis was effectively the same thing as most of the rest of the world receiving a diagnosis of allism!

I’d really like to spend a day living with a neurotypical head to see what it was like because it would be fascinating to compare with my own experience. Are there really people who sit still on chairs and don’t find it deeply exhausting and uncomfortable? Is it actually true that there are folk who can chat in small groups without trying consciously to compute every single thing they say and work out when they should contribute to the conversation? I’d be fascinated to discover – though I wouldn’t want to commit to more than a day because I’ve been used to my own head for quite a long time and there might be all sorts of things about my neurology that I’d suddenly miss – I don’t even know at this stage what they might be because I’m so used to my normal being my normal and so unaware of how other types of brains might work! Perhaps the fact that I worry little about things that seem to vex many people is part of my being autistic and I’d really miss that freedom of thought? Who knows? But I do know that I’ve discovered a contentment since getting my autism diagnosis that’s rather nice and that I’m not in a hurry to mess with it!

Anyway, I digress again. And now return to the tenet of autistic people themselves having a voice and being part of the discussion of neurodiversity. That is, of course, part of something that I do manage to do a bit (being a blogger, not a marcher), and, as I discussed in my final conference blog post, maybe an area to explore for the future. Who knows what I’ll be able to do, or what impact it might or might not have, but it’s a possible direction for the future and if I can ultimately be helpful to other members of the autistic community, which I have suddenly, and rather unexpectedly, become part of, then maybe that really will be something to be proud of!

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