A Short One

I have just been out for a walk.

This might not seem like particularly startling news. Especially when I tell you that my walk was just 2 kilometres long and I was out for under 20 minutes (the 2km actually took 18 minutes, 24.7 seconds).

The fact that I know that much detail about my walk (at an average pace of 9:12 per kilometre) will tell those in the know that I didn’t just amble round the block randomly, but I took my Garmin (running watch) and measured time and pace and so on.

I also wore my running shoes. A pair that have done a couple of marathons with me.

All this might seem rather irrelevant, and a slightly strange blog post. Maybe so.

But it is important.

Because it is the start of returning, properly, to life. It is a tiny bit of something approaching “normal” in this huge sea of autism and mental health and newness and unfamiliarity.

Aside from one short run in January, I have not run since November. Granted, I didn’t run today, but I took the first few steps (2043, according to my Garmin) towards it. Back in January I was making a desperate last-ditch attempt to be well enough for my spring marathon (and ultra) season, but I really wasn’t well enough, and quickly gave up.

So now I have abandoned all races until at least the autumn. And I am starting over. And I am making it as easy as possible to start over.

Because at the moment I am still struggling with inertia, massively. I’ll write properly about autistic inertia sometime – it’s the feature that means our brains are very good at persisting with things, often for hours on end, but are terrible at starting and stopping or switching tasks. The effort needed to start something is huge, and takes a lot of energy.

Furthermore, I still have huge anxiety when leaving the flat. My senses are still in overdrive from the burnout. The world is still loud and bright and full of so much information that I feel like my head might explode. Previously I would have used energy to mask these feelings, consciously blocking out the input to my senses – doing so for years has both left me too exhausted to function and has been seriously detrimental to my mental health.

So, in as far as I have any control over things, I am determined now, to be me, and not to use that energy unless I absolutely have to for survival. Furthermore, since the energy to mask ran out I can’t do it. I don’t have the resources to act any more, so I have to live as I am, now acutely aware of my heightened senses, but also no longer making myself be strong, no longer forcing myself to block them consciously, even though they are sometimes overwhelming.

Couple all that with the anxiety I’m still getting just leaving the flat, and you’ll begin to see why going out for a walk was such a big deal today.

And so my strategy was to make this first outing as easy as possible, so that all my energy could be focused on getting out of the flat, dealing with the overwhelming light, sound, smells and so on, and overcoming that initial hurdle of actually starting anything at all.

So no running clothes yet (there’s a sensory issue with fabrics touching my skin which I will have to deal with), and not yet backpacks or belts or other such kit. Daytime clothes, my familiar handbag for keys, phone, and inhaler, but just two relatively easy adjustments to my normal “leaving the flat” gear – my running shoes and my Garmin.

Tiny tiny adjustments. Minimising the “difference”. In order to get out at all soley for the purpose of exercise, without the pressure of an appointment or another person expecting something of me.

And a “workout” so easy that it didn’t tax me physically. I know I can easily walk 2 kilometres, so didn’t have to put that part of it into the pile of obstacles in my brain, didn’t have to factor in a tough training session when persuading myself just to go out at all.

And I took a regular route that I run often, a known 2 kilometres. In the early afternoon when most people would likely be at school or work, and I’d have as little chance of encountering people as possible.

And so it happened. Starting over. Picking up fragments of my old life, the life that fell to pieces when I discovered I was autistic. The life that almost ended in December. The life that I now have to rebuild, differently, readjusting now that I know better what will help me to stay well.

The absence of either job or offspring in my life, coupled with my extreme burnout and wildly fluctuating moods, has meant that there has been very little “normality” of any sort during the last six months. Learning about autism and my being autistic has been fascinating, but I am also worn out by it – my entire life has been consumed by it for months. I need to ease off – my head is full.

It’s time to reclaim just a few bits of “normal” life.

Slowly, gently, with space in between to recover.

A couple of kilometres at a time.

Talking and Listening

As a runner who has mental health issues it was, of course, a foregone conclusion that I would watch a television programme entitled “Mind over Marathon” – an account of how a group of people who have a variety of mental health conditions train to run the London Marathon in order to help improve their mental health. The programme is presented by a good and sensitive presenter with a team of “experts” to help, and also features a couple of young princes who are advocates for mental health awareness.

As a blogger who is currently trying to use the written word to explore my feelings about various things it was, of course, a foregone conclusion that my brain would be fizzing with thoughts that needed translating and my fingers would be itching to get to the keyboard in order to do that work. How successful I will be in trying to impart some of those thoughts, who knows, but I’ll give it a try.

But first, two really really big disclaimers, or “health warnings” or whatever you want to call them, about what I want to write later on.

ONE

I am in absolutely no doubt at all that it is massively massively good thing to talk about mental health. I think it’s great that young royals are getting involved in the whole business and raising awareness and making mental health part of the discourse of current life. Anything that can be done to “normalise” words such as “mental” (one of the participants on the television programme mentioned how uncomfortable he was using the word because of the derogatory connotations it sometimes has) and, indeed, “autistic” (which I’ve heard people say mustn’t be used because it’s an “insult” – er, no, if people are using it as an insult then they are misusing the word) is a good thing as far as I’m concerned. To take words such as “mental” and “autistic” and treat them in some ridiculous Voldemortesque way simply continues to ignore issues that need addressing in many people’s lives.

I have seen many posts online indicating that “It’s all very well for wealthy figureheads to talk about mental health, but what about the ordinary folk?” I have heard those messages and, to an extent, agree, and in no way do I believe that “Prince Harry says talk about mental health” means that the job is done and that “awareness has been raised” and we can all now comfortably go back to ignoring the real, everyday, practical problems that people are facing. BUT, out of my bubble of friends and online pages and groups, most of whom are pretty savvy about mental health issues (“mental” is a commonly used word in my life and I’ve been open about mental health issues for decades), there are still those out in the wider world who are not taking these things on board (some of the comments on mainstream media facebook pages alone are enough to indicate this is the case), and if a high-profile person talking openly helps, then yes yes yes, all to the good. Yes, a young privileged man who has suffered exogenous mental health issues as a result of going through the process of grieving the death of his mother in the public eye is not one with which most of us can relate, but it is valid personal experience and he has used the advantage of his position in the public eye to open the discourse.

TWO

I am also in absolutely no doubt that exercise has a huge and important role to play where mental (and indeed physical) health is concerned. I absolutely don’t need to be convinced about the wonder of running – I’m an ultrarunner and in the ultrarunning community it’s well-known that people have overcome depression, addiction, and all manner of other difficulties through the power of running. I don’t need to be convinced to enter a marathon – I do that just because I like doing it. I enter the ballot to run London every year but am yet to be successful. Running is awesome and cool and fabulous. I’m currently frustrated because my own difficulties currently mean I’m struggling to run and I’m really really keen to get back to it and gently pushing myself in that direction whenever I have the energy. I do not need anyone to tell me about the excellence of running – the sheer wonder that comes from being out on the trails alone in the middle of the night, with the moths fluttering in my head torch, is more than ample to persuade me.

I am, however, aware that running per se (and particularly yomping around the countryside alone at night) might not suit everybody and that other forms of exercise are available. Some people prefer to have a team around them, some have physical impairments that mean swimming is gentler on joints, and there are many barriers to some people exercising at all – it’s by no means easy, and it’s no panacea, rather, part of a toolkit that can really help improve mental health in some circumstances. I am also aware of the dangers of exercise addiction and its link to eating disorders and that not every journey to run a marathon ends in a triumphant finish line smile – for some, the stress of training or the frustration of injury can make mental health worse, not better. But, with these provisos, and other similar ones, I absolutely see how wonderful exercise can be, and it can play a really important part in achieving and maintaining good mental health.

***

Having said all of the above, what do I now want to add? What actually prompted me to write this post? And how can I address the issues to which I have alluded above?

The moment that triggered it for me was the point in the programme where they were interviewing a young woman who was clearly struggling with coming to terms with a massively traumatic experience in her life several years ago. Her child died suddenly, and her husband, overcome by grief, killed himself shortly afterwards. And this young woman sat on the telly and recounted what support had been available to her at the time – or, more accurately, recounted that there had been NO support available to her at the time. Nothing.

I don’t know what has occurred with her in the intervening years, and neither do I have the energy to do a research project on it, but it strikes me as shocking that her issues are only really being dealt with FIVE YEARS LATER! Five years is a very long time to be in mental anguish before you are eventually picked up by a TV programme. And, even now, it seems that in order to get the level of support that the TV people are providing, in terms of “experts” and so on, the woman has to run a bloody marathon – literally! (Please see disclaimer TWO above – and, of course, the marathon is the point of the programme).

And, watching the programme I was struck, not by the rigors of marathon training (that’s all familiar stuff to me – I went, as an obese fortysomething, from couch to marathon in seven months a couple of years back, and the training, exercises, foam rollering, so on are all part of the deal), but by the level of support that these people were given. Admittedly, the support came with a rather large side order of “we’re going to film this so you’ll be exposing your emotional vulnerability on national telly”, which I didn’t have to contend with, but neither did I have a cuddly TV presenter or an “expert” come and look after me when I was shaking because of the stress of leaving the flat before going out on training sessions – I had to do that bit on my own. The TV marathon training programme is therefore not looking at the effect of exercise alone on mental health, because it is providing these people with someone to talk to, someone who will listen to their issues (both the people on the show who can give feedback, and those of us sitting on our sofas at home), and that listening is really important.

I have been talking about mental health online for around a decade now. I’m pretty cool with it. I very quickly became totally public about being autistic. I talk about both mental health and autism. A LOT (probably too much, truth be told). When I have been in mental health crisis I have posted on my facebook wall and the overwhelming advice has been “seek help”, “go to see your doctor”, “get referred to a specialist”, and so on. So I have tried, on many occasions, to do just that. But it is a fight, and if you are already struggling, already finding life difficult, and already reluctant to ask for help because you feel, somehow, that it is your fault you are feeling this way (there’s an awful lot of guilt comes with many mental health conditions), then fighting through the system to get the help you need can be a seriously tough process. And if you have nobody who can advocate for you then it’s even worse. Persuading someone to listen to you can be very very difficult.

The problems I had trying to get an autism diagnosis in a psychological services department and my analysis of the situation are documented earlier on this blog (the only “treatment” available to me at that time was to “go to A&E” if I actually tried to kill myself). I was struck at the time by how little cohesion there was between the different services available and how there seems to be nobody available who can deal with all of my issues, as well as the fact that those with really low self esteem are seen in a building so dilapidated that the plants are growing through the wall! Even the superb autism service elsewhere that eventually diagnosed me as autistic, cannot, for example, suggest any medications that might help with the anxiety I get, and neither can they help me establish whether I also have comorbid ADHD (all the online tests and so on and research I’ve done suggest that I do), because that’s somebody else’s department (if I can ever find “somebody else” and can face the exhausting process of telling my life story, yet again, to another stranger).

So “seeking help” is not as easy as it might seem. In fact, for most of us, it’s really jolly difficult. I have heard tales of people who are totally broken being offered “telephone CBT” (when you’re vulnerable, you get rung up by a total stranger, who gives you your allotted time on the phone then hangs up, leaving you in a worse state), people who are unable to communicate with services they need because communication is only by post (not so good if you are frightened of opening the mail because of what it might say), and, people asking for help with fear of the telephone and who struggle to speak on the phone being given a leaflet and, yes, you’ve guessed it – told to call a telephone number!!!

Equally, “taking up exercise” is not as easy as it seems, especially when you’re mentally unwell. If you feel insecure and frightened walking down the street (many of us do) then you’re unlikely to find going out to walk or run very easy. Furthermore, if you want to swim, or join a gym, or get any sort of personal trainer, then it is expensive, even at reduced rate, and many mentally ill people are out of work and struggling financially – if you have to choose between paying your rent or joining a gym then you’d be pretty daft not to pay the rent. When I started running I was lucky – I had enough confidence to get out of the door and a husband who supported me all the way. I had enough money to get a pair of trainers and a sports bra to get started with (this wouldn’t always have been the case in my life), and I live in a place where many people run, and it isn’t a big deal. I also have serious hardcore willpower and a level of “persistence” that gobsmacks most people (possibly one of my autistic traits), but many do not. Though I know many people who are trying, some even apparently inspired by my own accounts of running and so on.

I fear I’ve raised more questions than answers here, and maybe that’s actually what’s needed. My experience in both the mental illness and autistic communities has been that so much of the support comes from within, from people also struggling. I am trying to work out what might have enabled me to continue in employment in order to help those might follow me and be able to maintain jobs where I couldn’t. I have developed strategies to support myself based on the writings of others whose blogs I read. There are groups and people everywhere trying to piece things together and help each other.

Equally, and, sometimes surprisingly, the running groups and fitness groups have also provided a source of support for me and, I observe, for others. Those who do not have the support of a TV programme have to look after each other, encourage each other, either to get out there for a run or whatever, to cope with the frustrations of injury, or to discuss the fates of toenails and so on. The online responses to people who are struggling with whatever aspect of their lives or training can sometimes be amazing.

However, online support can only go so far. And there is a danger that those of us in the mental health “world” exist in something of a bubble and that people outside of that world don’t realise just how tough it is to get help or to get out there and run a marathon when your mind is telling you to sit in your chair and wait to die or even to hasten the process by your own actions. What is really needed is concrete, joined-up support, and both mental health services and physical activities that are easy to access. That is a much much bigger ask, and I’m only one very ordinary person sitting alone typing into a computer, a person who is still struggling day to day, and trying to translate the thoughts whizzing round my head into comprehensible words, so I don’t really know what more I can do, other than keep talking and keep raising the issues.

And so I come to at least one conclusion, which is that programmes like “Mind over Marathon” and statements by young princes, are important. And they’re important because they raise issues that those of us who are just individuals with no resources and no power are unable to raise, because we cannot reach the people that TV programmes or princes can. They can persuade people who will never encounter somebody like me (for whom mental health is a normal part of daily discourse) to talk about their mental health issues, and they can encourage far more people to take up running or physical exercise than I ever will.

However, the worry with such high-profile campaigns is that people will feel that they have “done” mental illness. They’ve all watched the programme, they all know what it’s about, and, like with autism “awareness” there will be a general feeling of “yes yes, mental health, blah blah blah”, but mentally struggling people will still be showing up at their GP surgeries after weeks of angst about whether to attend the appointment because it’s all so scary, and will be given a telephone number, or a web address, or, at best, put on a waiting list that might be months, or even years, long. There are lots of small, quiet, voices out there, trying to talk about their mental health issues and begging for help.

There are also people like me, who are slightly noisier and more forthright and link to blog posts and so on and share mental illness stuff whenever we can, even though, sometimes, writing a post such as this one uses up all available energy for the day. Interestingly (and I’m not alone in this observation), when I share mental health stuff or posts from this blog (I know that this is, technically, an autism blog and that autism is not a mental illness etc etc) on my facebook wall, these days I get a small handful of “likes”, maybe 3 or 4 on average, if that. If I share a status about doing the laundry then I often get 30 or 40 responses! This suggests to me that people are ten times more interested in laundry than they are in autism or mental health issues!!! (Of course, it’s not quite as simple as that because facebook algorithms magnify posts that have already been liked and try to force people who share blog links to pay money for extra publicity and so on, but whatever the cause, the result is still the same).

On one level, it’s great to talk and to raise the profile of mental health issues, and it’s totally fabulous to run marathons if you can do it. If more people are encouraged to talk and run then that’s brilliant!

But on another level, there are many of us who are already talking about mental health issues (and in my case, now, also autistic issues), have been talking for years, and will continue to talk while we still have breath.

But is anybody listening?

Uncomfortable

Like a pendulum
Swinging wildly,
Undamped.
My mind has still
Not settled.

Where I fit
Into this new identity
Is still unclear.

I talk to people
And many of them
Expect answers,
Where I still have
Only questions.

Some days
There is despair
And a feeling
Of life being limited
Permanently.

Some days
There is hope
And a feeling
That life will improve
Substantially.

But where I fit
Into this new identity
Is still unclear.

I am suddenly forced
To confront issues
I had discarded
Years ago.

Things very very uncomfortable.
Offspring. Female identity.
Neither of which I possess.
Autism forces these things
Into my consciousness.

Not to mention
My own childhood,
A door I had long since closed
Forced open for diagnosis.

Can open.
Worms everywhere.
Wriggling around,
Demanding attention.

The past
Begging to be analysed

But where I fit
Into this new identity
Is still unclear.

There is no stable backdrop
To my life.
Everything wobbles.
Precariously.

And my mind
Is trying to alter its perceptions
Of who I am
But progress is slow,
Like an ocean liner
Doing a three-point turn.

As I try to plan
For a changed future
I desperately search
For familiarity
And stability.

Autism is exciting,
Enticing, shiny, new.
But this very newness
Makes it also feel
Alien and unfamiliar.

I have never fitted
Into a community
I am not used to being
“Part of things”
As soon as I become so,
I feel uncomfortable
And withdraw…

Where I fit
Into this new identity
Is still unclear.

My past needs
Reframing.

My future needs
Replanning.

There is uncertainty ahead
How functional will I be?
What can I try to do?
What do I want to do?

Preserve the old
Familiar interests
(accepting my limitations)?

Embrace the new
And shiny interests
(accepting intimidations)?

I ask myself
And many times
I search for answers,
Where I still have
Only questions.

Where I fit
Into this new identity
Is still unclear.

My mind has still
Not settled.
It swings wildly,
Like a pendulum,
Undamped…

Where I fit
Still
Unclear

Unknown

Uncertain

Uncomfortable

Cyber Housekeeping

Yesterday I did something that I didn’t think I’d ever do in any meaningful way. I returned to twitter.

Twitter and I have a long history (in fact, exactly as long as facebook and I do, since I joined them both on the same day). However, where facebook has provided me with a fairly steady relationship over the years, twitter has been the wild child, the passionate affair that burned brightly and eventually extinguished itself after an obsessive phase with it that saw me unable to go to bed for fear of “missing something” and some sort of falling out with a friend that I never really understood! After 44,400 tweets (or thereabouts, according to my account), we parted company around 5 years ago, and I visited only occasionally, usually to check up on major news events or occasional sporting things.

When I set up this blog I tried to set up a twitter account for it. I knew I should, but didn’t really want to return to my old account as I still wasn’t really sure at the time exactly how open I was eventually going to be about being autistic. The process had become more complicated than when I first joined twitter, and when I tried to log in from the app it wanted a phone number (which I wasn’t prepared to give it) so I just gave up and stuck to facebook.

However, things have changed since then. My friends have, from time to time, tagged my personal facebook account on the page, and, despite attempts to be vaguely circumspect about my identity (I’m not sure why – just that rather a lot of people seem to be so I figured it was the thing to do), it really wouldn’t be difficult to discover who I am. Furthermore, I’ve now reached a stage, since diagnosis, where talking about being autistic is much much easier, and this blog has taken off in a way I could never have predicted (if not in terms of readers, certainly in terms of posts)!

And I kept reading in other people’s blogs about the autistic community on twitter. About #actuallyautistic hashtags, and a whole load of stuff that seemed to suggest that twitter would be yet another source of information about autism – and finding out information about autism is, basically, one of my main reasons for living right now. As usual, the thing that has driven me, back to a social networking site I had given up, is my quest for information. As I’m sure I’ve mentioned before, when I get interested in something, I get VERY interested in it. And autism seems to have become one of my inquiring mind’s most recent victims (the other is the film Chariots of Fire, how it deviates from what really happened, 1920s sprinting in general, the 1924 Paris Olympics, and anything to do with either Harold Abrahams or Eric Liddell)!

So I’ve revamped my old account, complete with old followers and vast numbers of tweets that were probably mainly about tea and biscuits if I remember rightly! I changed the profile picture and cover photo (or whatever they’re called on twitter these days) to the ones associated with this blog and its facebook page, updated my biography to include something about being autistic, and started to engage with folk by tweet again.

So, 2000 or so random victims, who previously expressed an interest in viola playing, mathematics, running, or rats (and cats and other animals), will now likely wonder why they suddenly follow someone called Finally Knowing Me and start receiving tweets from some random autistic blogger! Although I expect discussions of cups of tea and so on will not be completely excluded – will just have to see how it goes because the whole “return to twitter” thing feels somewhat experimental at the moment.

At some point I’d like to tidy up the main pages of this blog a bit too. The Blog Guide is very out of date, the home page no longer really says what I want it to say, and the tags and categories (which I started using in a very random and experimental way because I really didn’t know what I was doing with them at the time) are all over the place. I expect there is a way to add a “twitter button” to it as well! Once I have enough energy and when I can trust myself not to stay on the computer so long that I end up unwell, I’ll try to organize things a bit better. I’m also aware that there are now so many posts here that anyone who arrives afresh might wonder what the heck is going on with it all – I know I would, but then I’m easily confused, so maybe that’s just me!

Everything is all, still, very much a “work in progress” at the moment. Eight months ago even the idea that I might possibly be autistic seemed totally wild and rather bonkers – an outlandish series of suggestions by a few friends! It was only just over six months ago that I first typed the words “I am autistic”, having done some research that indicated rather strongly that the friends were, in fact, correct. I disclosed publicly on this blog four months ago today, following the first rather disastrous attempt to get a formal diagnosis. And I was only, eventually, formally diagnosed seven weeks ago.

So it’s all very new. And I still don’t know what the final result of the whole discovery will be. I don’t know to what extent I will become “an autistic blogger” on any kind of permanent basis, or whether I’ll end up doing something else completely different. Oddly, I keep reading about people who describe discovering they are autistic as “finding their tribe”. I have rather mixed feelings about this – partly because I have actually discovered I’m not as interesting and unique as I thought I was (if you put me into a bucket full of neurotypical folk then I do, indeed, stand out as somewhat different, but if you put me into a bucket full of autistics then I’m actually rather ordinary (it’s the “autism nicked my schizzle” syndrome again))! And partly because I’ve lived without any sort of “tribe” for so long that the notion of belonging to any cohort of people, no matter what sort of people they are, seems somewhat intimidating. I have never had a “tribe” or been part of any sort of group in any meaningful way for any significant length of time. I have existed mainly on my own, as a single unit, and I was actually pretty reluctant even to get married until I discovered a husband who was also a single unit and didn’t expect much in the way of “togetherness”. If I’m going to regard myself as part of any sort of “tribe” or “group” then it’s going to require a bit of a shift of perspective – I’ve not really sought out human company in any great way in my life, and certainly the idea of “group” stuff really feels exceedingly strange.

Anyway, we’ll see how it goes, and we’ll see how twitter goes (and whether I end up with three followers and a few bots (does twitter still have bots?)), and I’ll continue to think about whether I ultimately become some sort of autistic advocate, turn any of these ramblings into some sort of book (though I sometimes get the feeling that there are now so many books that maybe I don’t have a great deal extra to add and should leave that stuff to the professional writers in any case – I’ve never ever believed that I “had a book in me”), and I’ll, obviously, continue to make random discoveries about myself and get used to my changed perspective on life and so on. And, for the time being, I’ll probably continue to subject you gentle readers to a few snapshots of the inside of my head, conveniently translated into word form for easy publication online, partly because, aside for a couple of follow up sessions with my assessor, there is no hapless therapist trying to figure out what’s going on between my ears so I have to do it myself and a blog seems as good a way to do it as any, and partly because one or two folk have told me that it is either educational, or even helpful to them!

An Achievement

47-2017-01-22-11-23-13This morning I went running. For the first time this year. The first time since early November. I only did 2 kilometres, at a pace of 7:15 per kilometre. Neither long nor fast. Under normal circumstances I’d hardly consider such a run worth putting my shoes on for – I’m an ultrarunner and I like to be out there for a long time. My usual idea of a “short run” is anything up to half marathon distance or so. My usual idea of a “long run” is one that takes a whole day and involves backpacks and nutrition and so on – maybe the “autistic intertia” that makes starting and stopping activities so difficult is actually an asset in ultrarunning?

However, during the last few months I’ve been so burnt out, so stressed, so frightened to leave the flat most of the time, that running simply hasn’t happened. Just the effort of putting kit on has been completely beyond me, and I’ve looked, slightly sadly, from time to time, at my pile of much-loved running shoes in the hallway, desperately hoping that I’ll be well enough to put them on again one day.

Running is one of the things that might, in autistic terms, be described as one of my “special interests”. I’ll discuss the whole concept of “obsessions”, “special interests” or whatever they’re called at some point – I tend just to think of mine as things I like, but I do recognize that when I like something enough to bother with it at all, I really do bother with it. The first day I put a pair of running shoes on and moved slightly faster than walking pace for one painful minute, I began a journey that would lead me to a 100 kilometre ultramarathon just 9 months later. I read the magazines, I’m obsessed with the kit, the nutrition, and so on. I have a steadily growing pile of books about running, and I love following online trackers of races and feats of endurance running whenever they’re available.

This last few months though, I’ve had to sit and watch as others actually did the running. I simply couldn’t manage it. Over the autumn I pulled out of two halves and four marathons, all of which I really wanted to do. I’ve realised that races are going to need some strategies to cope with – it has become obvious that when other runners chat to me it severely impairs my running performance, even people cheering me on uses language-processing power that means I have less energy available for the actual running. I absolutely hate having my name on a race vest – it freaks me out when random people suddenly shout my name – it is not encouraging for me, it is spooky and weird.

I have also always resisted joining a running club. People tell me the camaraderie is wonderful, and that the beers in the pub afterwards are lovely. But, to be honest, I’d rather give up running than have to join a club – I want to do running for running’s sake and one of the reasons it works for me as a way of getting fit is that I can do the actual running completely on my own. I like the quiet, the repetitive action of one foot in front of the other, over and over and over again, the same thing, lost in my own world. The minute someone talks to me that spell is broken and I am dragged back into a world where I have to work out other people and what they want and why they have spoken to me and what they are hoping to get out of this conversation. I’ve even been asked during races “What do you do?” WHY? Why, when I’m 20 miles into a marathon, would a total stranger ask me a difficult and complicated question that would take nearly all my resources to answer if I was sitting down and had a lot of breath and time to think about it? I don’t understand.

I do all my training alone. Even when my husband and I train “together” what we actually do is get changed into kit, tell each other approximately where we’re going to go and how far and what time we expect to be back, and then arrange to meet back at the car or wherever. The only times we have actually run together (once during a race that was going wrong when he was trying to protect me from people talking to me, and occasionally for safety reasons in rough conditions) we do not chat. We just run. That’s the beauty of running for me – it’s a solitary sport, something I control myself, which rarely involves other people or communication, a far cry from the bullying and dread that is my abiding memory of having to play team sports at school. I used to enjoy swimming until the sensory overload and proximity to other people in swimming pools made it unbearable.

But I enjoy races. I like to see what’s going on. I love looking at other people’s shoes and kit and so on, I like to see the ways races are organised, I like the welcoming sight of the next aid station and the excitement of seeing what goodies they might have available (sitting eating porridge and lemon tarts and drinking soup after nearly 24 hours out on a trail, cold and wet with a busted leg, is a special and wonderful thing). I like having a goal to aim for, a medal to put round my neck saying “I achieved something that I never thought I would”, and I like to make training plans and work out which days I’m going to devote to a long run and which foods I’m going to try to carry and pushing my body to its absolute limit.

I could give up races and confine myself to training or “virtual” races, but that isn’t my aim. I’m going to have to get fitter in order to compensate for the people – where many folk find the race “atmosphere” enhances their performance, it impairs mine, so I’m going to have to train harder. I have a marathon booked for the start of April (along with a very expensive hotel room). I’m now wondering whether I might actually be able to do it. I certainly haven’t given up. I was also planning my first 100 mile race in May, which probably looks unlikely at this stage – although there is an option to drop down to the 24 hour challenge, which might be a possibility. I’m keeping my options open for the moment.

One thing is certain. My obsession with running has not abated during my enforced rest period. In fact, I’ve become somewhat interested in historical sprinting while sitting in front of the TV with the DVD of Chariots of Fire on repeat for the last month. I’m now reading avidly almost everything I can lay my eyes on about Harold Abrahams, Eric Liddell, and the 1924 Paris Olympics, finding out the real stories behind the film, my head filling with little snippets of knowledge, which I won’t start listing here because I haven’t finished the process yet and it would already be more than a blog post’s worth!

The only books I have read in the last few months that haven’t been about autism (or science/maths text books for “work” type reasons) have been running books – not only those about historical figures, but contemporary tales of marathons and trail running. I’ve struggled to read much at all because my concentration is so poor, but, aside from the autism section of my personal library, running books are the others that have made it to the top of the pile.

But this morning I actually managed to run again. I woke up feeling as though I could, and having spent several days thinking about it, I decided to see whether I could actually do it. The hardest parts were, as they usually are, getting out of the flat in the first place, and then returning to the flat at the end. We share a communal staircase with everyone in the block, and we both live in utter terror of meeting a neighbour on the stairs and having to chat about something unexpected. Going out is actually better than getting home because we can hear people in the corridor outside so we simply hide behind the front door and wait for them to go, but the possibility of getting into the block and being nearly home but then bumping into someone is an anxiety we live with every time we get home from anywhere – the relief and ability to breathe properly again when we finally close and lock the door behind us is massive.

The run itself was lovely. I was pleasantly surprised that I haven’t lost as much fitness as I might have imagined – maybe up to two hours a day rocking hard on the sofa and bashing myself violently against a cushion has been good cross training? One of the things that has also been better about this episode of burnout / mental illness than during previous episodes is that I went into it very physically fit. Previously I’ve not only been mentally very low, but I’ve also been very overweight (I used to be a person who struggled to climb stairs, even lifting my legs with my arms to go up steps at one stage) and extremely unfit and incapable of walking any distance at all. The physical fitness has helped no end – running has turned out to be a very good “special interest” to have acquired.

And this morning I finally started to increase my fitness again, just a tiny bit. I can’t imagine this will be a totally smooth ascent – I’m not pushing anything hard at the moment because I know that the only real cures for burnout are solitude and rest, but now I’ve been out once, remembered I can do it, and been through the familiar routine of putting kit on and so on, maybe it’ll be a little bit easier next time. And although I’ll never be a sprinter at the 1924 Olympics, I might manage to get good enough to run again in one of my favourite marathons in one of my favourite cities in April.

A very special friend of mine in a distant and beautiful part of the world wrote one of the books I am currently reading. It is called “Run Gently Out There”.

That is exactly what I hope to keep doing.