Vague Head

Yesterday I posted the following status on my facebook:

Somewhat “vague” today. Not bad, just somewhat purposeless and lacking in any sort of knowing what to do. I’m sure there’s something must need doing, but I haven’t quite figured out what it is. And my head’s doing that “wandery” thing where it can’t quite figure anything out!

And later, replied to a comment on that post with the words:

I’m in one of those moods where I want to write stuff. But the head is blank. There’s nothing there. The little translation people in my head who sort the words have taken a day off.

As it turned out, I wasn’t wrong that the little translation people had taken a day off. By the time I got into bed my spoken words were becoming somewhat nonsensical, and by the time my husband had fallen asleep, they’d gone completely. I didn’t manage to get any sleep myself until nearly 4 am, so it was a rather tedious night. Even by this morning I still wasn’t able to ask him what time he’d be home from work because I couldn’t summon the energy to form a sentence that long and complicated.

And I’ve spent most of this morning in a state of some sort of shutdown. And that sort of “sad” feeling pervades. And everything seems to be a bit triggering and there are so many things on facebook that make me angry but I don’t quite have the capability to debate them because I’m right at the start of this process and I haven’t yet got to the stage where I can analyse and present the arguments in a way I want, so I read that according to the labels I’m supposed to be “high functioning”, because I could speak as a child, and I feel so desperate because I can’t remember how to work my socks and it’s nearly 2 pm and I’ve not yet been capable of eating or drinking anything, but that’s OK, because I’m “high functioning” so my life must be brilliant, like those autistic people in silicon valley who can do computer things without crying and so on. And everything’s all jumbled up in my head and I can’t really quite get the spoons together to make sense of it all, so I just sit at home in my horrible dark messy flat, staring at the forms for the state benefits I don’t want to claim because they scare me so much but I know I have to because I cannot hold down a job and my husband’s working flat out and we’re still not breaking even. But it’s OK, because I’m “high functioning”, and my sort of autism would be described by most people as “mild”. And there are parents on groups talking about their autistic children as some sort of tragedy and saying that because their children are “severe” they will never be able to live independently and that the adult “mild” autistics don’t understand. Even those of us who cannot live independently – independent living is a distant dream for me, a world that I might never attain! And they even have children at all, which, to someone like me who was never able to have any, seems terribly ungrateful. And I see the success stories and the smiling graduation pictures and I remember how hard I worked (not at the subject, but at being able to live) to get through my degree, and the early morning drinking to enable me to cope with the world, and the picture that everyone else saw of a smiling person in mortarboard and gown and how much damage I was doing behind the scenes by pretending to be strong that by the time I was in my late 20s I was downing bottles of whisky and packets of pills in the hope that I wouldn’t ever wake up again.

And all this goes round and round in my head like some sort of mess, from which I hope, one day, to extract some sense, some coherent argument, some way of trying to explain all this to people that they will understand, that they will think about. And how important it is not to pressurize autistic people into appearing “normal” from the outside because it is doing us so much damage on the inside. And I sort of hope that people will realise why all this stuff is so triggering and difficult for so many of us, but I realise that many of them probably won’t, and just like I’ve had to learn in other areas of my life, there are times when I really should hide the offending posts on facebook and move on, because my own quality of life is often so poor that I need not to make it poorer by staying awake all night, nonverbal, triggered by all this stuff, and wishing that I’d never been born because my life is such a bloody awful mess. And even as I type that sentence I’m worried that I’m lining up “nonverbal” next to “triggered” and so on, and I want to go back and change it (but I don’t have the spoons) because it implies that nonverbal (which really should be called nonspeech anyway because typing is verbal, just not spoken) is bad, and it isn’t, at least not from the inside – it feels calmer and less stressful than trying to maintain conversation, which is often hard deliberate work. I usually find that I start to feel worse and worse when I’m trying to hang on to speech, but feel much better once it has gone, an inner peace that isn’t available when trying to communicate by talking. Yet so much of the outside world seems to see this silence as a bad thing. And I am confused. And now, reading that paragraph back, I realise how social media, which is largely responsible for triggering many of these thoughts, is simultaneously wonderful and difficult, because without it I would spend most of my life without any human interaction at all, but with it I am exposed to things that are often difficult to cope with. And there’s another whole blog post to be written about that too.

And as I type this I wonder whether even to post it. Because I want to make proper, reasoned posts about all these things at some point, and I want to explore as many angles of the debate as possible. Despite my never having succeeded in academia, I am an academic at heart, a scientist, a person who tries to be as rational and logical as possible and to try to understand the opposing point of view in arguments, even if I subsequently dismiss that point of view.

But I am also just a person. A very broken person, with a lot of baggage still to unpack, a lot of self-esteem issues to deal with, a lot of practical problems to tackle, and a very very struggling head that doesn’t even think in words and needs to expend vast amounts of energy to translate the concepts and pictures and feelings into words in order to communicate them to other human beings. Even then, I don’t always get it right – it’s clear from replies to things that I say on facebook that others don’t always understand what I mean and maybe I’m not clear enough.

Note: I ran this post by my husband, who suggested that I add the words “I do understand that people who say ‘you aren’t broken’ are trying to be helpful but it is often the opposite of helpful so please, if you would like to know how to help, you can start by not telling me ‘you’re still you’ or ‘you’re not broken.’ Thank you.” (There’s a whole blog post to write about that at some point too – the extent to which I’m “me” or “broken” is massively complicated in my head and I need to work it out for myself, which will take some time).

I will do the proper blog posts at some point. The ones on my list, in which I discuss functioning labels, in which I discuss speech, in which I discuss how damaging internally it can be to an autistic person to try to behave socially in the same way as most other people can, and about how some of us who have been doing it unknowingly for decades have struggled to work out why life has consistently been so tough and gone so very wrong and have ended up so very broken and burnt out as a consequence of putting in so much effort for such a long time.

But I need more time for those. I need the soupy mess in my head to settle, so I can see. I need to do it when the translation mechanism is running smoothly and my head is clear and I’m not dealing with so many other things at once.

If I do decide to post this, then it will feel like one of the “braver” (to use a word that others have used to describe this blog) posts, because I am raising issues that are difficult, and I’m doing so without even having the capability to debate them, or with the backup of sufficient knowledge in my head, which feels like a rather frightening, and maybe risky, thing to do. But one of the things I was determined to do at the outset of this whole blogging enterprise was to try to be honest (or, at least as honest as I can be – there are things I have to leave unsaid sometimes to protect other people because my story is my own, to use as I please, but where it intersects with the lives of specific others I sometimes have to tread more carefully).

Maybe, however, it will be worth it if it encourages others to think about these issues. Although I know I’m already triggering myself massively just by typing this stuff up, never mind what will happen if I post it.

Perhaps the very best course of action at this point would be to go and see whether the connections in my head are working sufficiently well to make a cup of tea. And if they’re not, to get someone on social media to talk me through the process so at least I’ve had a hot drink today, even if nothing else!

Talking About It

I described, in Strategy Deployment, how I had dinner in College a few nights ago. The routines and protocols of such dinners are generally well-known to me, and one of those routines is a loose convention that you tend to chat to one of your neighbours during the first course of dinner and another during the second. It’s not a hard and fast “rule”, and who you actually end up chatting to depends a bit upon circumstances, but you can reasonably expect to talk to at least two people during the course of the meal.

On one side of me I had my best friend, who knows everything about what’s been going on in my life over the last eight months. He and I chatted, initially, across the table (we were on a corner) to his other neighbour. My main memory of that conversation was that we discussed the renovation of a pianola, owned by this other person – for me a nice, easy, safe topic of conversation, music and mechanics combined. No problem!

On my other side was another person I know reasonably well, a former tutor of mine from nearly 30 years ago, who I last saw at a dinner in 2013. As the main course arrived, he turned to me and first apologised for ignoring me during the starter (he’d been catching up with his other neighbour), as appropriate, and then he asked me, predictably, what I was doing these days.

There had already been a slight mention of the fact that we’d sat right on the end of the table, in the corner, when we first sat down. My best friend had explained that “there was a reason” we’d chosen those particular seats, and the fact that I was wearing dark glasses gave another clue that things were not “entirely regular”.

So, at the moment the question about “what I was doing these days” was asked, I had a choice. I could either (a) try my hardest to come up with some sort of conversation that made some sort of sense and would be adequate for the occasion, (b) ramble on a bit about “life being interesting” and “a few sensory issues” (to explain the dark glasses), or (c) just give the whole “I just got diagnosed autistic” speech!

A couple of months ago, when I went Out to Dinner, I was pre-diagnosis, and just being out of the flat at any social occasion at all was a huge thing for me. That evening, there were a couple of people there who knew what was going on in my life (one was my best friend, and another is friends on facebook and reads some of these blog posts), but a third friend didn’t know, and, two months ago I wasn’t ready to tell him, in person, by speaking. On that occasion I opted for option (b) and then e-mailed him after the event, sending him the link to this blog to explain more fully.

A month later, just before diagnosis, I was at an orchestra rehearsal, and wanted to explain to another non-facebook friend, what was going on. I managed, just, to get the words out, but was shaking and terrified, even though I knew that she was the sort of person who would be absolutely understanding and, like everyone I’ve so far told, she reacted by saying “Yes, of COURSE, that makes so much sense.” However, being able to articulate, in words, out in the big wide world, to other people who didn’t already know, that I was autistic, was still, at that point, seriously difficult.

Those of you who have been reading this blog since its inception must be wondering how this can possibly be. I’ve now been writing about being autistic, in as much detail as I can persuade my head to produce, for months. Yet just one month ago I could hardly form the spoken words to describe what was going on and two months ago I couldn’t do it at all. Of course, what might or might not have been evident from the early posts of this blog was the absolute fear when I posted The Discovery as to how my news might be received, especially as I was taking a huge gamble by disclosing after the disaster of my first assessment, as described in Too Articulate and Too Complicated. At that point I decided to disclose anyway since I couldn’t work out how to carry on living without doing so, and I got to the point where I’d decided that the risk of losing what remaining social life I had was probably worth taking in order to stop the feelings of no longer wanting to exist. But it wasn’t easy.

However, the blog moved on, the response has actually been amazing, and I’m now typing stuff about being autistic into one of my various devices on pretty much a daily basis.

But I still hadn’t reached the point where I could TALK about it to people who didn’t already know by reading the blog – at least not without almost falling apart on the spot and wishing the ground would swallow me up there and then and never spit me out ever again.

So, now returning to the point at which my former tutor turned to me and asked me “what I was doing these days”, what did I do?

I started with a couple of sentences reminding him that there was a “reason” I was sitting on this side of the table, I mentioned the dark glasses, and then I finally got to the point where I went for option (c) on my list above.

I’m certain I talked too much, and probably didn’t obey the proper rules of back and forth conversation. I also couldn’t quite multitask and eat my dinner at the same time. And my “I’m recently diagnosed autistic and this is how it came about and so on and so on and so on…” script is still very much in its embryonic stage (part of what I’m doing when I write these blog posts is teaching myself how to talk about it, part of what I’m doing when I read other blog posts and articles and books is giving myself the vocabulary to be able to talk about it, and starting to form my own ideas and where I fit in to the autistic world and how being autistic affects my life).

But, for the first time, I told someone who didn’t already know, and managed to do it without falling to pieces and shaking so much that I nearly dropped my drink, or starting to feel my speech fragment, and was able to have some discussion about it.

Admittedly, for me, dinner in College, at a place that has now been familiar to me for the best part of 30 years, feels like a safe environment. I’m lucky to be able to return to the social world, gently, in such a place, following familiar routines, and knowing that the people around me are likely to be sympathetic, and, on the whole, interested. So it was a good place to start.

However, I think the other thing that really helped was the confidence I have gained since I was formally diagnosed. I don’t think I could have had that conversation at this stage without that extra confidence.

But, whatever the circumstances, and whatever the reasons, it was the first time that I had been able to sensibly discuss being autistic with someone who didn’t already know. It was the beginning of being able to talk about it to other people – actual talking, not typing on a blog post, which is very different. I have known since the “autism hypothesis” formed, right back in August 2016, that if the hypothesis turned out to be true then I would need to find ways of talking about it, and I would need to construct scripts and work out how to explain to people (maybe, even in the fullness of time, be able to educate and inform and advocate, who knows). I’m not fully there yet, but I’m a huge step nearer than I was this time last week!

One Month On

I have how had my official autism diagnosis for a month. In that month, life has continued to change almost as rapidly as it did before I was diagnosed. My father’s cancer diagnosis has obviously changed my priorities with regard to how I spend my limited energy over the coming months. My financial situation has once more become difficult and precarious and is causing me considerable amounts of anxiety. And I have, with huge regret, realised that I cannot, at this time, continue with the maths degree that I so badly wanted to finish, so it is time to let go, to stop pushing, and to admit that I have simply run out of time and energy.

Obviously, life is still a long way from where I’d like it to be. My sleep patterns are still poor, which is not great, but they’re better than they were a few months ago. I’m now managing to leave the flat around twice a week, which is a slight improvement. When I do go out I am slightly better able to cope because I am more aware of which strategies work for me and I’m learning to give myself more recovery time afterwards.

I have now started, very slowly, to eat just a little better than I have been doing, which is no bad thing, since I saw a full-length photo of myself recently and was slightly shocked at how thin I looked. I finally weighed myself a couple of days ago and discovered that I’ve lost a stone since last summer, simply because I have felt too sick and anxious to cope with food. This is not good – I was not trying to lose weight, particularly not in that way, and I am just lucky that I was in good enough physical condition to start with that my body could cope. I am also still drinking too much alcohol in order to cope, but am starting to try to cut down just a bit in order not to do too much more damage to my physical health.

However, despite all the difficulties mentioned above, the persistent insomnia, the struggles to go out, and the continuing dysfunctional relationship with both food and alcohol, there are signs that things are improving. My husband and several friends have remarked that they perceive my underlying mental state to be improved and, even though I’m still getting some extremely sad, angry, and regretful moments, I’m starting to accept things as they are in a way that I didn’t before my formal diagnosis.

There were several people who said, before my diagnosis, that since I knew I was autistic, they knew I was autistic, and my friends and family accepted that I was autistic, there really wasn’t any necessity for me to pursue a formal diagnosis in order to understand myself. What none of these people understood, however, was my need for validation, reassurance that I hadn’t simply imagined the whole thing, and the huge huge confidence that the formal diagnosis has given me. This might not be necessary for everyone, but for me it was essential. And it really has made a massive difference to my life.

The formal diagnosis also, for me, marked the end of the old life, and the beginning of the new one. The process of discovery in the preceding months was like a sort of introduction, perhaps an overture before the curtain was raised at the beginning of the first act, or maybe the preface before the start of chapter one. My old life has been demolished, and now the process of rebuilding can begin.

There is obviously a lot of relief that the process of seeking a diagnosis is now over, and I feel, even more than previously, that my life now makes sense in a way that it never previously did. As I predicted in the last few paragraphs of Why Bother, the diagnosis has finally given me full permission to stop regarding myself as a naughty, lazy, failure of a human being. I also feel liberated from the pressure to “succeed” that has pervaded my whole life so far. There is still a long way to go and I still, frequently, feel that I am not entitled to breathe the air and that the world would be a better place without me, but I am still only a month into the new life, and there’s nearly half a century of the old one to analyse, reevaluate, and reframe.

Furthermore, I have to go through the process of mourning the life I might have had if only it had been recognised that I was autistic before I got to my mid 40s. There are still difficult topics to tackle – the mental health professionals who failed for two decades to recognise it, my childhood, the incessant, triggering, references to small children when I try to research autistic traits, and where I fit, if at all, into the autistic community (I am used to being alone and to shying away from being part of any sort of group, and discovering that there are others who experience so many of the same things as I do is, for me, somewhat disconcerting).

But one month after diagnosis there is a calm, even more so than that I felt after discovery. I strongly believe that there is a very good chance that my mental health will, eventually, be better than it has been for decades, possibly even than ever before. I am already, after just four weeks, much more confident about describing myself as autistic, and feeling that I have a right to do so. I’m also treating myself much more gently than I did previously – because now I have official permission!

I’m certain there will be yet more phases to go through, and not all will be easy, but maybe, just maybe, I will eventually rebuild a life that works. And it will be a better life than the one that officially ended four weeks ago.

Cataclysm

77-2017-02-25-21-38-12It is now just over a week since I received my autism diagnosis. I had been hoping to “celebrate” that mini-anniversary today, but, as happens, life throws things in the way when you’re least expecting them, so I am having to devote a lot of brain space to dealing with something else currently. The week that has passed since my diagnosis is therefore, today, being “quietly noted” and little more.

If I am quiet here for a few days, then please forgive me. I might need a few days. My organization of my blog posts is also a bit lacking, and I need to do a bit of catching up with filing and sorting (when you find yourself using the search feature on your own blog to try to find out whether you’ve already posted that bit of writing you know you need to do a bit of sorting). Now that I have my diagnosis I’d like to make some sort of reference guide here (better than the Blog Guide) so people can follow the diagnostic procedure. I’m aware that new people have now started reading this blog and following it and might feel like they’re arriving part way through something. I’d really like to categorise and get the tags and so on a bit more useful, particularly for other autistic people and those who are keen to learn. I’ll try, but for now I need a little space. I’d also really like to write up last week’s assessment, but have not yet been able to find enough words and my head is still processing everything.

There is much to be done. I am trying to do what I can as well as I can as fast as I can, but my capabilities are currently not very good, so it might be slow progress. But I am very grateful for so much feedback and so on here, and for the people who have liked the facebook page and people I don’t even know who have said how much what I write resonates with them.

I wrote the words below a few days ago, with the title above. That title describes the state of my head right now, for several reasons. Things change. Autistic brains need lots of time to process change. In the meantime, they don’t necessarily work very well. I am doing my best. Please don’t ask any further – I’m not currently able to answer questions, and my capacity to produce words, even typed ones, has reduced again recently. I need a few days on the sofa, curled up under a blanket, rocking gently, staring at junk telly. My husband is, as usual, being magnificent, and caring for me brilliantly.

It still feels like a dream.
Like I will wake up at some point
And I will be in a tent in a field.

It will be summer 2016,
The point at which something was spotted
And mentioned, by several people.

After 45 years of a life that didn’t fit,
Full of difficulties and mental illness,
The truth started to reveal itself.

The more I learnt,
The more I discovered
That my “normal” was “different”.

I started to investigate my past
And found out
Just how many things tallied.

I started to adapt to my changed reality,
But needed a firm answer,
A piece of paper.

So I asked, and I filled in forms,
And I wrote down information.
120 pages of it!

I waited, and I endured an appointment
That nearly finished me.
And did not help.

But now I have the formal answer.
I know why my life has gone
So badly wrong so many times.

The process of discovery is over
And the rebuilding of my shattered life
Can now begin.

It feels surreal, like a dream.
It’s good. I know it’s good.
The relief at all now making sense.

But it will take time for everything
To feel “normal” again and for my head
To recover from the cataclysm.

Go Gently…

76-2017-02-24-13-40-18The message I receive
From those who have been here
Those who have discovered
Late in life
That they are autistic

Is

That this processing will take some time
And will not always be easy.

And I need to go gently.

I am listening to these people
And I am listening well
Because they have been here
And they know
And their neurology is the same
As mine.

I said from the start
Right back in late August 2016
When the autism hypothesis (now accepted)
Was formed…

That this will happen at my pace
In my way
According to my schedule.

And everything I hear
Confirms that.

“A couple of years”
Seems to be about the time
Taken
For full processing.

And,
Of course,
I need to recover from burnout.

I know I need
To stim
A LOT.
A very very lot.
The minute I started to listen properly
To my body
That became obvious.

What I am struggling with
Is how much
I cannot do.

How much
I need to rest.

How much time I need
To spend
Alone.

I have the biggest
FOMO
Ever.

I have pared back my life
But I need to cut even more.

And life continues.
Much of it
Is not optional
And must be dealt with
Appropriately.

My emotions are confused
And unidentifiable.

My functionality is also
Very very poor.

But at least the process
Is now started.

I will emerge.

Eventually.

Still Processing

75-2017-02-24-13-42-19I’m in one of those slightly frustrated phases right now. One where my brain really wants to get on and do things and to try to sort out my life, but my mind is still very very busy processing recent events. It’s now just after midday on Friday and I feel as though I should be able to “just get on with it” now, although I’ve just calculated that it’s nearly 96 hours since I received my diagnosis, and, when I put it like that, it’s no wonder I’m still trying to take things in and trying to work everything out. And when I then remember that I’ve never been very good at processing feelings, it’s even less surprising.

My week so far has run thus:

Monday: Five hour autism assessment in an unfamiliar town, concluding with clear diagnosis that I am autistic. Drive home and sit, almost unable to move. Sleep a little. Eat a little. Drink wine.

Tuesday: Utterly exhausted. Hardly able to process. Wrapped in compression bashing myself against the sofa. Short blog post written but unable to post. Good feelings, but not ones I can articulate well. Relief. Shock. It’s real.

Wednesday: A bit more functional. Able to post on the blog and write a couple more posts in draft. Sort the house a bit. However, start to feel ill in the afternoon and completely lose speech early evening. Speech never returns all night.

Thursday: Attempt to get up at reasonable time but fail. Head won’t work properly at all. Publish one of the draft posts. Afternoon lose functionality and retreat under weighted blanket. Attempts to sort out jobs lists fail. Plan to do stuff tomorrow.

Friday: Finally make it out of bed around midday after frustrating morning in bed. Realisation that things I wanted to do today are beyond me. Just getting this far is an achievement. I also had a spell trying to establish whether I was lonely or bored – I’m not sure I can distinguish between the two.

If I stop beating myself up (not literally – though the impulse to tear chunks out of my skin is very very strong this morning and is taking a lot of energy to resist), then looking at this objectively, I see that 96 hours out from receiving an autism diagnosis at age 45, it’s actually not that surprising. I know from what I’ve read on forums and groups and in books that getting a formal diagnosis is an amazing thing, but I also know that it takes some processing, and moods can be erratic for some time afterwards until the system settles down. My brain and my learning and my reading knows all this stuff. And, I have to keep reminding myself, AUTISTIC BRAINS DO NOT LIKE CHANGE!!!!

I keep forgetting this last piece of information, and I always believed myself to be quite flexible, but when I actually started looking at the evidence it turned out not to be the case. I need a new handbag – my old one is too small (since the advent of multiple pairs of spectacles and lots of stim toys). I have a new handbag. It is very nice. I like it. It will be a very good handbag. But the notion of changing to a different sort of handbag is freaking me out. Bigtime. The new handbag has been waiting for a month so far. I am too frightened to take the stuff out of the old handbag and put it into the new one, because I know it will feel wrong for quite a long time until I get used to it. Autistic brains. Change. Don’t like.

And, of course, this is why we get so tired. Conscious brain has to be employed constantly to compensate for the strong messages coming from the autistic bit. There is the neverending internal fight between what I have always termed “brain” and “mind”. In my head, always, I have had to employ vast amounts of willpower from brain in order to overcome the evident illness (some of which now relabeled anxiety caused by autistic brain) of my mind. The terminology is a bit muddled here I know – I didn’t script this and am trying to write improvisatorily, which is rapidly turning into nonsense.

Back to the script.

What I HAD been hoping to do today was: sort out the jobs list, order a repeat prescription, send a few of the more urgent e-mails (I really need to sort my study situation with the OU because time is getting short, and if I’m to dine in College after a meeting booked for next week then I have to sign in), maybe visit my best friend (haven’t seen him for a couple of weeks and also need to catch up on meetings and assessments and collect my scarf, which I left there), call my mother (again, update on assessment, especially since she provided so much info about me age 0-4 and some beyond that too), hoover the flat (it’s at the point where if we had a visitor we’d have to provide overshoes for them to protect their shoes, but the loudness of the hoover and my sensory system’s state today probably mean that’s out), maybe do some maths (concentration nowhere near sufficient – I’m managing less than a paragraph at a time of my book on my current special interest (Chariots of Fire) at the moment), and what I really wanted to do was to go out and get a coffee and cheesecake (way too late now because the early morning quiet spell will be long finished, but I haven’t had coffee for so long), get a few jobs done (I need to go to the bank and buy one or two things), and maybe go and look at some food and see if I can get inspired to eat anything (I’m currently still on only about 1.5 meals a day, which really isn’t enough).

Of course, lined up like this, it’s obvious that someone who has had the week I’ve just had wouldn’t have a hope of doing all of that. Maybe just being able to list it here will be a start on sorting out the jobs list and trying to work out what really DOES need doing and what can wait for a while.

It’s also been on my mind all morning that I’ve still not managed to get back to proper running. This is not surprising, since I’m still very much in burnout, and the diagnostic process has taken a huge amount out of me, but it’s now looking less and less likely that I will be able to do any of the spring races I still have booked. One of my favourite marathons is unlikely to happen, and with it will go the expensive hotel room I booked last year. I don’t have the energy to do anything about it. Maybe we’ll go and stay there anyway, although at the moment the thought of going to a crowded city to watch a marathon I should have been running in just feels scary. I’d rather be on a deserted beach staring at the sea by myself. I’ve known for ages that my first hundred miler, booked for May, just isn’t possible in my current state, but saying goodbye to it is hard, and to the other marathon I had booked. Again – although I have to do this, it’s change, and again, change doesn’t sit easily with me.

So add all that to the inevitable exhaustion from Monday and it’s no wonder things are a bit rocky right now. I’m also almost climbing the walls waiting for the report from the assessment people, even though they told me clearly and straightforwardly, that it could take up to a fortnight because there was a lot of material to go through and times and so on and don’t panic. But still. I’m impatient.

And, my head is, predictably, making words in a very erratic manner. There are either too many of them (see above) or too few (see below). Writing the words below was probably my biggest achievement of yesterday! Who knows what my biggest achievement of today will be – I’ll have to see what I can manage. But I also need to keep reminding myself that the biggest thing of my life has occurred over the last 6 months and that 96 hours ago it was officially confirmed, and my head will still be processing it all for a while yet and I do need a fair bit of time just staring at a pea factory, curled up under my blanket, and rocking back and forth and so on.

I
Am
Autistic.

Three words.
Define my life.

I knew that
Before the assessment.

But

Now

It is
Real.

Knowledge.
Relief.
Validation.

But also change.

My head
Still
Processing.

I am autistic.
I am autistic.
I am autistic.

Dear head,
Got that now?

I am autistic.
I am autistic.
I am autistic.

Yes, really.

What’s odd is:

Nothing is different
And
Everything is different.

The feelings
(Various)
Strong strong strong.

Huge waves
Of emotion
Alternate rapidly
With
Numbness.

I still need
To let go
And relax

But
Too soon.

Although
Yesterday
My words gone
All evening.

Let the news
Sink in.

Absorb it.

It is big.

Take
Everything

One

Step

At

A

Time.

FKM Officially!

73-2016-12-15-16-23-48I’m still reeling from the events of Monday. My thoughts are still not totally working coherently, and I have a whole bunch of feelings that I can’t identify and am still trying to work out. Both my husband and I are still also massively worn out after months of strain.

Five hours of talking to anyone about anything is something I find exhausting under any circumstances, and when a lot of that talk is to two new people, and the outcome of the process is really important, and a lot of the subject matter centres around my childhood, difficulties I’ve had through life, and the poor state of my mental health, it becomes even more exhausting. I even came home with a sore throat, simply because I’m not used to that much talking!

Yesterday I didn’t even have the energy to open the laptop to turn my jottings into a blog post, though I did complete One Day After, ready to post when I could. The evening of the assessment itself I managed to put up the Announcement (along with a visual fanfare for the picture), and jotted down the following, which never made it any further than a jotting:

Knackered
Shocked
Did all that really happen
Me
Autistic
Officially
Diagnosed

Thirsty from talking
Relief relief relief
They were amused when I said 2002 symmetrical

They asked me what happy felt like
I didn’t know
Perhaps this is happy

There are still so many things to discuss, and to work out, and to sort. Still lots of big feelings that haven’t quite worked out what they are yet. I can’t describe them because I can’t make the words happen properly yet, but I know they’re good. But very big. It’s almost 48 hours since I was diagnosed as I type these words, and it still feels very brand new and different.

There’s something significant about discovering I am autistic after 45 years of a life that kept going wrong in so many ways for so long, and working out why. And the whole notion of what I’d regarded as my normal being something that turned out to be the result of a different sort of brain. And how odd it is to type autism into search bars and find a whole load of other people who are the same as me, having spent my life with other people telling me that life wasn’t like this, it was like that, but for me it was like this, and apparently that’s because I’m autistic and it’s like this for other autistic people too. That’s really strange in so many ways.

And it’s all going to take a lot of working out, but I can start to do that properly now. The confirmation from the people I saw on Monday is a huge step to working it all out, partly because they UNDERSTOOD. They actually knew what I meant, and they made the assessment in a way that got the things that might cause problems and worked out how to deal with them before they happened. I’ll write it all up properly sometime, when my head’s processed it all.

And after a childhood working like crazy to try to fit in to the world, and a teenage accepting that I never would and taking refuge in music and study because they were the only things I really understood, and a quarter of a century of adulthood plagued by mental illness and the desire to be dead, some people finally got what it was and gave me an official label to explain why it had all been like that, and, when autism is added to bipolar disorder (that diagnosis still stands, as a comorbid condition), things make sense.

After so long living a life that didn’t work, to find people who believed what I said, and understood, and could finally officially say what was going on, was such a relief. And, interestingly, I even learnt a whole load more about another of my autistic traits, as it became obvious that there was something else I hadn’t even considered, that is clearly a result of autism (I’ll blog about it sometime, but not enough words now).

This assessment could not have been more different from the first. Totally different experience. To those who are out there still in the position I was in last week – keep going, keep asking, because there are people who can do it right and it is worth it.

I know that all my “problems” are not solved simply by being officially diagnosed. I know that there is a lot still to process. I know that there will still be dark times – being an autistic with bipolar disorder and anxiety probably means that my life will not ever be totally easy and smooth. I know that having a diagnosis isn’t some sort of magic spell that will cure everything, and that it’s a starting point for trying to work out how I can best function in the world and best live my life. But I now have that starting point, and it’s straight in my head, and I have the best chance now of official help or necessary adaptations or whatever.

Just a couple of weeks ago I wrote something on my phone (it was another started poem that never went anywhere) about my doubts, and how I wondered if I was just going mad. Going through a 5 hour assessment with people who clearly understood and knew what they were doing, and being told straight away that I clearly fulfilled the criteria for a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder (for that is its official title these days) has cleared those doubts.

The people will now write a report. I’m impatient to see it already, but my husband reminds me that I must be patient. Then they will give me a follow up appointment in about 4 weeks time, so I can gather questions and so on to ask them and they will point me in the right direction.

It’s the start of a new phase of life. I would be crying with happiness, but that point hasn’t yet been reached. Those sort of emotional reactions take quite a lot of days to happen for me, and the feelings are still buried under a whole load of surreality and slight dreamlikeness.

But it’s good. Properly good. Finally knowing me – officially.