Typing The Words

Although the notion of me being autistic had been suggested by several people throughout the month of August 2016, and I’d started to research the idea seriously on the 23rd August, and then been to see my GP to get some sort of outside opinion on 16th September, by this time last year I hadn’t yet actually admitted to myself that this whole “autism hypothesis” thing was anything more than, well, a hypothesis!

I had, however, assembled a really tiny chat group on facebook, because I needed somewhere to be able to talk about what was going on, and the thought of declaring myself autistic on my main facebook wall (where most of my social life takes place) was WAY too much for me at that point. Furthermore, nobody outside of my immediate “every day” circle, or who hadn’t been there over the summer, knew what was going on. I was still getting used to the idea, and trying to explain to other people something that I barely understood myself would have been utterly impossible.

So, a few days after seeing the doctor, I set up the tiny chat group, and added just a very few people – really those who had happened to be in the right (or maybe wrong) place at the right (or wrong) time. Several were people who already knew what was going on, some had already helped me in some way, some had been through the same process, and some were folk who I simply knew I could count on because I’d been able to in the past.

The group became a sort of journal for me, although this time a year ago I didn’t know it was going to be that way. It was also, between September and December 2016, an absolute lifeline. I needed to talk about what was going on, and not just to my husband, and, thankfully, I found a way of doing so. There were around half a dozen people who endured hour after hour of me going on and on, and propped me up and kept me going through those times. I shall be forever grateful to them.

I hadn’t, at this stage, even discovered that there were autistic groups on facebook, neither had I found blogs by other autistic adults. That would come later, and even then I joined one or two groups and lurked silently, not even daring to comment, because somehow I felt like I wasn’t allowed – the groups were evidently full of “proper autistics”, real grown-up ones, not like me, who was just some random person who was a bit odd! They all seemed to know stuff I didn’t, so I silently read and learnt, because that was all I could do at that stage.

When I eventually did discover blogs, the best I could do was to follow their facebook pages if they had one. I didn’t, at that time, have a blog account that I could use, because I hadn’t set this one up yet, and, again, like the facebook groups, I wouldn’t have dared to comment. I’m still struggling a bit with the interaction element of blog commenting and even responding to comments on this blog – I need to have a very high energy day to be able to respond to comments (which, I assure those of you who have made them, I have read and will respond to) in the ways that I’d like as it takes many more spoons than simply writing a post and putting it up. This is my equivalent of presenting a paper, which I can do relatively easily on about 50% of days, but taking questions afterwards I’m still finding challenging, as I mentioned in Responding and Communicating.

So, for the time being, it was my tiny group of trusted allies, some autistic, some not, and, of course, the ever growing pile of books – once I’d bought the first couple from Amazon, the Amazon “suggestions” did much of the rest of the work, and buying books from Amazon was something familiar and easy, so that was what I did!

And, it was one year ago today, in that tiny group, that I first typed the words quoted at the bottom of The Discovery, and, after just a few weeks of suggestion and investigation, started to identify as autistic. It’s almost as though today is the first anniversary of me disclosing to myself!

I actually accepted the idea rather easily, mainly because, once I started to discover what being autistic actually was, it became really obvious that I was it. Although only months earlier I’d still just had some vague notion that autism was mainly something to do with small boys who didn’t talk or brainy computer geeks who took things rather literally or some sort of special educational needs thing or savants (yes, I was as susceptible to absorbing the stereotypes as many other people are, and I certainly didn’t believe any of the above related to me in any way, and neither had I ever had reason to wonder), as soon as I started to investigate and learn the full reality, it was obvious that it applied to me.

Interestingly, looking back, what I didn’t know a year ago was just HOW MUCH autism applied to me. I had yet to discover things that my mother was eventually to remember about my early childhood – things that I would never have discovered had I not gone for an autism diagnosis. At the time there was still a long way to go with the process of discovery (and I suspect there still is – I’m still getting moments where I suddenly realise something I’ve always done is not just “me” but is an autistic trait).

And although it felt weird because it was new, I had no problem with the idea of the identity “autistic”. I pick up from various places online that there is, apparently, some sort of stigma attached to the word, but I didn’t feel anything bad about it. I suspect that’s partly because of where I live and the people I come into contact with (there are very few of them and many are also neurodivergent or allies), partly because I had already had two decades with several mental illness labels so “autistic”, although new, and different, was, to me, just another thing to add to the list, and partly because I’d been used to being different from other people for so long, that actually it seemed pretty cool to have a name for the sort of different that I was! Furthermore, discovering that I wasn’t naughty and lazy, as had previously been thought, was such a relief that I embraced “autistic” with open arms!

And so, a year ago today, I typed the words that I’d realised, only a few weeks after the first suggestions, were absolutely correct. It did feel strange, unfamiliar, and new, in the same way that “I have bipolar disorder” had felt strange nearly a decade earlier, and “I have depression” had, a decade before that, but it also felt right, and still does. However, a year later I don’t have to type the words on a tiny chat group on facebook, and I don’t then need to then jump up and down going “fuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuck” to recover from the experience. I can type them on open facebook, on a public blog post, and I can even, now, relatively easily (as long as my words are working) just tell people.

That feels like quite a big change in the past year. And it had to be a gradual process, while my brain adapted to the new identity and I got used to the knowledge of what sort of brain I have. But the same words still apply, and these days they’ve lost almost all the “this feels a bit weird” stuff, and are now just a factual description of my neurology coupled with a big part of my identity.

I am autistic.

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Hypothesis Formation

Yesterday, the following status appeared in my facebook memories from one year ago:

Did all that just happen? Now to try and remember what I was doing 3 weeks ago. And to consider what to do with the new information concerning how my head reacts to stuff.

At that point I didn’t mention on my facebook wall that it had been suggested by several people that I might be autistic. I just vaguely alluded to “new information” about “my head”. As far as I was concerned, the notion of me being autistic seemed extremely strange, extremely unnerving, and, as far as I knew at that point, extremely “not me”!!!

Oh, how I laugh at that last bit now!!!!!

I certainly wasn’t going to start chattering on about it on facebook at that time, and, as far as I can remember, I was still really regarding the whole “me being autistic” thing as one of those slightly wild ideas that folk have and that would eventually fall by the wayside as being just another one of those theories. I didn’t want to post something up on my wall, be shouted down by a whole bunch of people, and then unfriended by a whole bunch more. I wasn’t confident enough of anything at that time to mention the idea to more than my husband and one or two friends.

However, the fact that several people had, independently, suggested that I might be autistic was enough to make me take the idea seriously enough to do some research and see if I might find out what was at the root of their suggestions.

I did what anyone brought up with a toe in the world of science would do. I formed a hypothesis, which I called the “autism hypothesis” (i.e. proving the hypothesis would mean that I had gathered enough evidence to confirm that I was autistic, and disproving would mean that there was insufficient evidence and I wasn’t autistic and I could ditch the whole idea and just go and have a drink and forget about it).

So then I had to investigate the hypothesis. Gather evidence. Find out what this whole “autism thing” was actually about!

A friend of mine had sent a copy of Liane Holliday Willey’s Pretending to be Normal to me and I’d read it with a certain amount of bemusement – apparently it was something to do with autism, but it just seemed like a fairly ordinary account of someone’s life as far as I could tell. It was enough to convince me to investigate further, but I needed more INFORMATION! Actual information, not a life story.

And so I did the modern day equivalent of what my father told me to do when I was young. Back in my childhood if anybody wanted to know anything the answer was always to “get a book from the library” and to find out that way.

I have not been into a lending library for many many years (I think the last time I went into one was for a job interview and I was unsuccessful). And I don’t believe a lending library would have been much help to me.

So I tried Google, which was also no help because it presented me with page after page of search results about small children and parenting and so on. The world of adult autistic blogs was still inaccessible to me as I didn’t know what I was looking for, or that it existed, or how to find it. And it certainly wouldn’t have occurred to me at that stage that there were groups for autistic people on facebook or hashtags on twitter or anything of that sort.

So I went back to what I knew, which was books, and typed “adult autistic” into the Amazon search bar. And discovered a book with a promising title: Cynthia Kim’s I Think I Might Be Autistic (or as it subsequently became known in our household “The book with the pencils in the wrong order”).

And on the 23rd August 2016 I downloaded the sample from the start of the book onto the Kindle app on my iPad and had a look at it.

It pleased me from the start. It provided what I wanted – information, an outline of the diagnostic criteria for autism, and the start of a list of questions that was evidently continued beyond the free sample that I had. This book was speaking my language – it had facts and lists and promised to provide me with exactly what I’d been looking for to start to work on proving or disproving the newly-formed hypothesis.

My Amazon records show that I ordered the paperback copy the same day. And that was the day on which Time Stood Still for me. The 2016 calendar STILL shows 23rd August as the date, and maybe it always will. In Time Stood Still I referred to some sort of mental breakdown, which I now know to be a huge episode of autistic burnout.kn

It was to be months before I started to emerge from that burnout (and I still haven’t, fully) and from that moment almost my entire life was taken up with investigating the newly-formed hypothesis and, later, with trying to obtain a formal diagnosis.

I read the criteria from the sample of the book on my iPad over and over again, and waited for the paperback to arrive in our mailbox so I could try to work out what the diagnostic criteria actually meant, and whether any of them had any relevance to me.

With all that’s happened in the last 12 months, and with the knowledge I now have, it seems utterly extraordinary that it was only a year ago that I started seriously to investigate the possibility that I might be autistic.

And I certainly wasn’t telling anyone who didn’t need to know about it at that stage!

If anyone had told me I’d be blogging about it publicly within 4 months I’d have thought they’d gone mad!