Works In Progress

I’m aware that blog posts have been a little erratic of late, and it might seem that I’m doing less writing or losing interest. In fact, that’s not the case at all, and what’s actually happening at the moment is that I’m trying to work on a couple of projects, both of which will probably extend to multiple blog posts, and both of which I really want to get right and be as accurate and clear as possible, since both are important for different reasons.

One is the story of my final autism assessment, the one where I received my diagnosis. I’ve started work on this, but remembering back and trying to write exactly what I want about it is taking quite a lot of energy and is quite hard work, so it’s not happening overnight. It’s more of an “end of term assignment” than “this week’s homework”. It might take another week or so for me to complete this project.

The other is a write up of what happened on Tuesday of this week when I attended the National Autistic Society’s conference on Autism and Mental Health. I’m trying to write up the experience and what I learnt (I took 11 pages of notes), and my thoughts on the day as a whole. There are many of these thoughts and sorting them all out into presentable form will take a while. I’m currently working on them as fast as I can.

Furthermore, as is obvious from the preceding paragraph, I’ve actually been out in the world again doing things quite a lot recently. I’ve been to the conference, met up with a new friend, played quite a lot of music, and am also meeting up with old friends over the coming weekend. Furthermore, I’m starting to organize my life and plan for the future a bit too and have started thinking about goals and plans for the next few years in a way that I haven’t done for a very long time. Most of these things are taking a massive amount of social, sensory, and executive functioning energy and I’m needing to undertake a certain amount of self care (downtime in between, remembering to eat, etc) in order to cope with my increased activity levels while still continuing to recover from burnout. It’s a tricky balance to achieve.

So I’m still here, still working on these things, and still trying to do a good job of giving information and my viewpoint and doing so as clearly as possible. I’m still also working on tidying up this blog and making a complete list of posts and so on, but all this will take a little time, even though I’m very very determined. I’m doing, as I always do, my absolute best with it all.

But I’m only one human with a rather erratic mind, and I’m acutely aware that I need to protect my mental health so I don’t relapse, so it might take a few days for me to catch up on everything I’d like to say.

I’ll get there!

Clear Air

The storm didn’t really come in the form of a meltdown in the end. I was so exhausted that it morphed into a shutdown instead.

I’d had a really really busy day. The busiest in months. I went to play in a performance of Mendelssohn’s Elijah with a local choral society – playing my viola from time to time is one of the very few things I didn’t abandon completely when burnout hit. The gig entailed a three hour rehearsal in the afternoon, then being hosted at someone’s house for supper, then the concert in the evening, which also lasted nearly three hours.

I’d done a similar gig last December, but declined the supper invitation and spent the intervening time sitting in the car on my own. This time I braved supper – partly, admittedly, because it was done on a “get in touch if you don’t want to have supper” basis this time around and my “getting in touch” abilities are pretty poor at the moment!

So I’d had this massively long full-on day. I’d been totally open about being autistic and having mental health issues (I’m getting slightly better at talking about it all). I’d kept my sunglasses on for most of the day. I’d coped with eating while sitting on a proper chair at a table and even participated in the conversation over supper a bit. I’d left supper slightly early to give myself some space to be alone before the concert. I’d spent most of the interval sitting on the floor, wearing my ear defenders and rocking back and forth. And I had, of course, played all 90 pages of the viola part of Elijah – twice (perversely, although physically very tiring, that was actually the easy bit)!

I got home and downed a few glasses of wine and ate some cheese, then went for a bath.

And then felt exactly as I had done in the pub episode in Sudden Illness.

I suddenly felt absolutely dreadful, sat up in the bath, unable to keep still, and burst into tears.

And this is where what happens now deviates from what used to happen in the past.

In the past, I would have stoically continued, as I did in the pub, to act as “normally” as possible. I might well have ended up being sick, and would probably have got almost no sleep and have spent the night in bed lying awake, shaking, believing myself to have some sort of illness that I couldn’t quite rationalise. I have pushed on and on in such circumstances so many times.

And the result of that pushing has been a continual decline in my mental health, a continual drain on my energy, and the resulting burnouts and erosion of my functioning abilities. Trying to be strong has, in fact, weakened me. “Faking it until I make it” has not worked – in fact, the more I faked it, the less I made it.

So I sat in the bath and cried, and my husband came to investigate and found a distraught mess. He calmed me down and drank the orange juice that I had asked for not long before as I indicated that I couldn’t drink it. And he also realised that my ability to speak was completely gone. Fortunately he’s used to it – and actually rather reassured now that we know I’m autistic, having thought, for the last fifteen years, that when I didn’t speak to him for hours at a time I was actually cross with him for some misdemeanour!

Then I went to bed, and beat my head against the pillow for a bit, before finally settling down to sleep. And I did sleep, where, in the past, I would have been unlikely to.

The next day my words didn’t return until mid-afternoon. My system finally closed down, and I did little more than lie on the sofa and sleep from time to time. But I felt calmer. The tension had gone. The storm had passed. The air had cleared.

And now I understand why this happens from time to time it feels easier to cope with. I’m not getting ill in the same way I did when I tried to fight through and keep still and so on. Although, perversely, the behaviour I exhibit probably looks more disturbing and maybe even frightening from the outside, from the inside it is very different.

In the past, an outside observer would just have seen someone who seemed like they were unwell and therefore became quiet – I’d have looked as most people expected me to look. But inside I would have been feeling utterly terrible, utterly unable to comprehend why I felt so bad, and in a total state of panic and desperation.

These days an observer would see someone who was completely unable to talk, compulsively rocking, maybe flapping their hands, bashing themselves against things, and even (though I try not to do this too much) hitting their own legs and arms with their fists. The part of me that has spent over 40 years trying to fit into a neurotypical world knows that I must look odd, and even maybe distressing, to the outside observer.

But inside, these things calm me. Inside they feel instinctive and normal and OK and can very quickly make me feel much much better, better enough to settle down to sleep. Better enough to wake the next morning and know that it doesn’t matter if I still can’t speak and I have to draw a letter T on my husband’s skin with my finger to indicate that I’d like a cup of tea.

And he no longer thinks I’m just asking for tea that way because I can’t be bothered to ask properly. And I no longer force the words to return before they are ready, and my brain therefore has time to recover.

It still feels very new, because it is still very new, allowing myself to be like this. I know from reading posts on groups and so on that many late diagnosed autistic people struggle to allow themselves to be who they really are, after decades learning to live a different way. And I’m certainly not always finding it easy – the intersections with the outside world can be particularly difficult at times, and the change from the old life is huge. But I am determined to live as my real self – 45 years was quite long enough to maintain the act that so nearly killed me on many occasions.

So that is the way it now is. And my way is to allow myself to be as fully autistic as I need to be wherever and whenever possible. And to be open about it as much as I can.

And maybe it sounds really odd, but that actually makes me really really happy, because it feels so completely right.

The new life becomes more and more real as time goes on.

Oscillating

The undamped pendulum mentioned in Uncomfortable continues to swing. My life continues to feel like it has some way to go before it settles into whatever my new “normal” becomes.

I don’t imagine, for one moment, that I shall ever achieve the stability that many people seem to in their lives – I’m just not built that way, and I know that monitoring my mood and my functioning abilities and so on will probably always be a part of my life. I know that my abilities and skills are very uneven and that they fluctuate significantly from day to day – yesterday it took me 3 hours to make a cup of tea, but this morning it was less than an hour. And, when I look back through my life, these things have always been the case.

But I do believe that things will eventually settle into something a little less crazy. I’m still only 9 months out from the very first suggestions that I might be autistic and only 11 weeks out from my diagnosis. These are early days, and things I have read by others suggest that life will calm down somewhat over the next year or so.

As I start to recover a little from burnout I’m also pushing myself out into the world a bit more. Strictly speaking I don’t NEED to push myself quite as much as I do (people say to me that I should take time, rest, and so on), but I am keen to get back to things and to do as much as I can (simply because I’m generally interested in stuff I think). The result of the pushing when out is that I’m regressing slightly at home – returning to the simpler comfort food more often, spending more time stimming, losing verbal functionality a bit more often, and so on. I’m starting to work on observing the patterns and looking at ways of monitoring them.

And so, each time I increase my activity, or push myself, or whatever, the oscillations get bigger, and then I need to stop and allow things to settle a bit. I find myself switching, every few days between two basic states – one in which I’m really negative and struggling and finding life tough, and the other in which I’m actually quite positive and optimistic and keen to make plans for the future.

So, during the negative times I end up with these sorts of feelings:

1. I want to hide under the duvet, away from the world, safe underneath a blanket, and just stay indoors in the dark for ever.

2. I do not want to eat, drink, or, sometimes even move. I am anxious and distracted and every tiny thing feels like a huge huge effort.

3. I am hypersensitive to things that I read, and I worry that I’m getting things wrong socially, even online. I constantly find that people don’t react to things the way I expect them to and I feel like my judgement is off somehow.

4. I struggle even to post on this blog or on my facebook wall and don’t feel that I have the right to be around or to even breathe the air. I’m frightened of the whole thing, nervous to post blog links up in case people hate them and don’t want to read them, fearful that I’ve upset people when the number of page likes goes down, and so on.

5. I feel like an alien everywhere and like a total beginner, even within autistic communities such as on social media and the blogging world. It’s like everyone else is somehow a “grown-up” and I’m standing in the corner at the party trying to work out what to do.

6. I feel huge fatigue at the whole “autism thing”. I look at the pile of books and scroll through my feed and I wonder what happened (I’d hardly even heard of any of this a year ago). I feel worn out by the last 9 months, the constant research, the incessant discovery, and I just want to do something different.

7. I sometimes feel totally freaked out by the whole thing. Everything has happened so fast. Suddenly my life was upended and I’m autistic and what on Earth happened there and I don’t know who I am any more, and I just want life to go back to normal and stop throwing weird shit at me.

8. I feel as if it will never get better and that if life is going to be like this for ever I can see very little point continuing with it. I feel useless and believe that I will never be able to contribute anything of real value to society.

And during the positive times I end up with THESE sorts of feelings:

1. I want to be out in the world again, back in my running shoes, back playing in orchestras, going for coffee, seeing people, and so on.

2. I’m even starting to fancy particular foods again on the better days and I can manage to eat a little more and a little more sensibly. I can do laundry and a bit of admin work.

3. I’m better able to respond with humour and more capable of brushing off the difficult stuff using brainpower. I put a more positive interpretation on things that are said and am learning to weed out the “advice” that I now know is not helpful for me. I cope better when the response is not what I was expecting because I know that’s part of my social imagination difficulties and I can rationalise it.

4. I will happily chat away on social media, share blog posts, and even write more posts with a certain level of confidence. If fewer people like the page then it’s no big deal, and if people don’t like me posting links to blog posts then I’m not really worried – folk have a right to choose what they look at or otherwise.

5. I feel that I do have some experience and knowledge about being autistic that I can contribute to the discussions, and when I feel like an outsider I’m perfectly comfortable with that – I’ve never needed a “tribe” before and I don’t really need one now. I can just be me, whatever that turns out to be.

6. I still feel that there is so much to learn about autism and being autistic. There are more books to read, more things to learn, and I have a huge list of things to research and blog about and discover. I’m even diagnosed now and can do this at my pace, and I might even find an area that interests me enough to form part of my future.

7. I feel so much more “at peace” with myself than I’ve ever felt. Discovering that I’m autistic might be new and unfamiliar and a bit crazy, but I know it’s right and it explains so much and I feel so much happier already and am treating myself more gently and appropriately and there’s no way I could go back to the old life, ever, because this new one is so much more ME and I find myself thinking how wonderful it is to have discovered it at last and I want to go and shout it from the rooftops!

8. I feel like there is hope for a much better future. I make plans for things I’d like to do in the next five years and I start to think about what I might like to do with the rest of my life. I feel like I might even be able to do something useful at some point and think about what that might be.

And so, these two states describe my life currently. I oscillate between them approximately every 2-3 days. On the good days I catch up with admin, write blog posts, try to do a little work, maybe play my viola, get some exercise, and sort the house out a little. On the bad days I just try to get through, to survive, and to still be alive at bedtime.

There’s some connection between the amount I push myself and make myself do things and go out into the world and the two states above – sometimes I deliberately maintain a positive “act” of sorts (maybe I am still masking somewhat) in order to do something I want to do or have planned and don’t want to cancel, and the result can be a tumble into the negative state. I’ve also noticed that the negative states often end with me becoming nonverbal, as though they’re caused by my head needing some sort of “reboot” and also that meltdowns are more likely in that state, particularly when I’ve pushed myself out and maintained the “act” described above.

And so the cycle continues, and I expect it will for some time to come as my brain continues to process things and I continue to work out how to deal with such wildly fluctuating moods and energy levels.

I guess it keeps life interesting…

Feeling OK

I have pushed myself a great deal in the last week, used a lot of energy.

I am tired, my senses are not quite right, and my ability to discuss and to write what I want to is impaired.

I started three blog posts earlier, never getting further than a paragraph into each of them.

There is so much information in my head, and it needs organising but it is stubbornly refusing to yield to my efforts to organise it.

I have a list of jobs I want to do. Not even things that are particularly unpleasant, but I am finding them impossible.

My anxiety rises when I even think about them.

Fortunately they can wait until tomorrow without triggering disaster.

I still want to organise this blog slightly better and tidy it up a bit.

But today is one of those days when even making a cup of tea is difficult. One of those days where my mind will not be persuaded.

The consequence of pushing myself is loss of ability and function.

And a certain measure of frustration.

But, even having said all of the above, I am not feeling particularly low about it.

Even though I feel ill from anxiety, and it took until four in the afternoon for me to manage to eat anything.

Even though I haven’t achieved what I wanted to achieve and the jobs list has rolled over to tomorrow.

I am not beating myself up about it as I would have done in the past.

I am slowly learning that the standards by which I have been judging myself for the last forty or so years are not appropriate for me.

I need more time than most people.

I need more rest than most people.

I need to limit my contact with other people.

And that’s OK.

It is not my job to accommodate everybody else and to try to do everything their way – I already do so much of that and have been doing so for years.

It’s not my job to answer every single question on Facebook – even though I might know a good answer.

It is not always my job to be an autism advocate, correcting language that I know is not preferable, trying to explain everything to everyone all at once.

It is not always my job to fight ableism, not always.

Sometimes I remember that part of being autistic means I need time for me.

I need time to recover from social things.

I need time to stim and to watch the same film over and over again.

And I am starting to learn all this, starting, slowly, to learn to be myself and not to feel guilty about it.

Starting to realise that others are wrong when they tell me what I should be doing – because they are using a set of parameters that don’t work for me and others like me.

And letting that stuff go. It is not for me.

Because I really am different. And trying to fit in and be like other people all these years has led to constant disaster, because it was all an act.

And starting to process all this, starting to allow myself to absorb this information fully, is good.

So the jobs list remains intact, and the place remains untidy, and the memes I still want to make remain unmade.

The more “intelligent” blog posts will have to wait, and once again I am simply writing what I can.

I might be knowledgeable about what it is like to be autistic, and I might be able to help others understand.

But that knowledge comes from my being autistic – and having discovered I am autistic, and decided that I am going to allow myself to be as fully autistic as I possibly can, I need time to explore how that works for me and how I now interact with the world and conduct my life.

And I am still getting used to talking about it to those who don’t know, and might not understand. I am still finding the words to explain.

And that’s OK.

Because I am recovering, both from forty years of pretending and now from a busy week of pushing.

And I know why I feel like this.

And why I need more time.

And in some sort of bizarre way, I am just content to be me.

It wasn’t the life I expected. It wasn’t the life I trained for. But it is the life I got.

And accepting it and working with it makes so much more sense than the constant fighting of my previous life.

This is just a fraction of what being autistic and knowing about it means to me.

“Autistic” is not a pejorative label, nor a disaster, nor something for me to hide.

It is permission to be myself.

And to feel better.

Some days, like this one, when I’m not achieving, and I allow myself not to worry about it, and I start to accept this new and different life, it really does feel OK.

Validation

I had the first of two follow up sessions with my autism assessor. It had been a tough week, one that had tested my resolve to stay alive somewhat significantly. So much doubt, so many thoughts planted in my mind about whether I really knew what I was on about. Was I as wrong about things, as I had been told? Confidence so very low.

I parked. My husband met me, with coffee, which we drank while sitting on a low wall in the sunshine. We walked the 15 minutes or so to the arranged venue (different from where I went for the assessment, closer to home).

And there she was, the assessor. Same dress as before. Familiar. Room set up so I could escape if needed. Lights off, just the sunlight from the window. She made me a cup of tea and fetched my husband a glass of water. I took off my boots and folded my legs under me on the chair, gently rocking back and forth, chewing my fingers a bit.

We discussed the report. We went through the list of questions I’d sent her, one of which was particularly important to me. We discussed what had happened in the weeks since my diagnosis. We discussed the reactions of various people I’d told about my diagnosis – both the positive and the more challenging.

This is not the post for coherent detail – it is written on the evening of the follow up. I am feeling, for the first time this week, that it is worth staying on the planet, and that there might actually be a point to all this. I am relaxed, positive, and maybe even happy. I am not writing an academic essay right now, with proper structure or detail, just a brief account. Nearly one of those “maybe poems”, but not quite.

And, with a professional in front of me, I asked the other questions. Not the ones on the paper, the answers to which were so important to me in any case and really clarified things in my mind. But the other ones, the ones that have been swirling round my mind all week.

Because I had been told that I was wrong. I was told that my analysis of the situation was incorrect, and the implication was that I should listen to someone else, who believed they knew better than me, who believed that I didn’t know what I was talking about.

So I asked the professional. The person who has massive experience, and knows what the answers are to the questions. And she said I was right. My analysis of the situation and my needs was correct. I was not going crazy, and if anyone told me that I was wrong about these things then I should ignore them, because I did know, and I was right.

The sense of validation was huge. Maybe even more so than the day of my diagnosis.

We emerged from the appointment after an hour or so, having arranged to be in e-mail contact. Back into the sunshine and what had just become a considerably more lovely day. My husband bought me some cheese. We chatted for a while, about the positive experience and maybe some hopes for the future.

And he stayed in town to work, the work he has to do to sustain us. I drove home.

And didn’t consciously have to stay alive.

Because I am right, and I am validated.

In many many ways.

One Month On

I have how had my official autism diagnosis for a month. In that month, life has continued to change almost as rapidly as it did before I was diagnosed. My father’s cancer diagnosis has obviously changed my priorities with regard to how I spend my limited energy over the coming months. My financial situation has once more become difficult and precarious and is causing me considerable amounts of anxiety. And I have, with huge regret, realised that I cannot, at this time, continue with the maths degree that I so badly wanted to finish, so it is time to let go, to stop pushing, and to admit that I have simply run out of time and energy.

Obviously, life is still a long way from where I’d like it to be. My sleep patterns are still poor, which is not great, but they’re better than they were a few months ago. I’m now managing to leave the flat around twice a week, which is a slight improvement. When I do go out I am slightly better able to cope because I am more aware of which strategies work for me and I’m learning to give myself more recovery time afterwards.

I have now started, very slowly, to eat just a little better than I have been doing, which is no bad thing, since I saw a full-length photo of myself recently and was slightly shocked at how thin I looked. I finally weighed myself a couple of days ago and discovered that I’ve lost a stone since last summer, simply because I have felt too sick and anxious to cope with food. This is not good – I was not trying to lose weight, particularly not in that way, and I am just lucky that I was in good enough physical condition to start with that my body could cope. I am also still drinking too much alcohol in order to cope, but am starting to try to cut down just a bit in order not to do too much more damage to my physical health.

However, despite all the difficulties mentioned above, the persistent insomnia, the struggles to go out, and the continuing dysfunctional relationship with both food and alcohol, there are signs that things are improving. My husband and several friends have remarked that they perceive my underlying mental state to be improved and, even though I’m still getting some extremely sad, angry, and regretful moments, I’m starting to accept things as they are in a way that I didn’t before my formal diagnosis.

There were several people who said, before my diagnosis, that since I knew I was autistic, they knew I was autistic, and my friends and family accepted that I was autistic, there really wasn’t any necessity for me to pursue a formal diagnosis in order to understand myself. What none of these people understood, however, was my need for validation, reassurance that I hadn’t simply imagined the whole thing, and the huge huge confidence that the formal diagnosis has given me. This might not be necessary for everyone, but for me it was essential. And it really has made a massive difference to my life.

The formal diagnosis also, for me, marked the end of the old life, and the beginning of the new one. The process of discovery in the preceding months was like a sort of introduction, perhaps an overture before the curtain was raised at the beginning of the first act, or maybe the preface before the start of chapter one. My old life has been demolished, and now the process of rebuilding can begin.

There is obviously a lot of relief that the process of seeking a diagnosis is now over, and I feel, even more than previously, that my life now makes sense in a way that it never previously did. As I predicted in the last few paragraphs of Why Bother, the diagnosis has finally given me full permission to stop regarding myself as a naughty, lazy, failure of a human being. I also feel liberated from the pressure to “succeed” that has pervaded my whole life so far. There is still a long way to go and I still, frequently, feel that I am not entitled to breathe the air and that the world would be a better place without me, but I am still only a month into the new life, and there’s nearly half a century of the old one to analyse, reevaluate, and reframe.

Furthermore, I have to go through the process of mourning the life I might have had if only it had been recognised that I was autistic before I got to my mid 40s. There are still difficult topics to tackle – the mental health professionals who failed for two decades to recognise it, my childhood, the incessant, triggering, references to small children when I try to research autistic traits, and where I fit, if at all, into the autistic community (I am used to being alone and to shying away from being part of any sort of group, and discovering that there are others who experience so many of the same things as I do is, for me, somewhat disconcerting).

But one month after diagnosis there is a calm, even more so than that I felt after discovery. I strongly believe that there is a very good chance that my mental health will, eventually, be better than it has been for decades, possibly even than ever before. I am already, after just four weeks, much more confident about describing myself as autistic, and feeling that I have a right to do so. I’m also treating myself much more gently than I did previously – because now I have official permission!

I’m certain there will be yet more phases to go through, and not all will be easy, but maybe, just maybe, I will eventually rebuild a life that works. And it will be a better life than the one that officially ended four weeks ago.

Recovery Time

I’m aware that I continue to be a bit absent from this blog at the moment. I’m finding getting the energy together to post is currently a bit more challenging than it has been, and the words aren’t flowing very easily.

I’d say there were probably several reasons for this.

1. I’m trying to get out into the world a couple of times a week at the moment – every time I leave the flat it uses huge amounts of energy and I need a lot of time to recover. But sitting in the dark by myself in a very small, cramped, untidy flat for around 14 hours a day on average isn’t very exciting, so I’m doing what I can to make life a little more interesting.

2. I’m using additional energy to communicate with my family following my father’s cancer diagnosis. I’ve fixed up to meet with him in a couple of weeks and that has become a priority for me.

3. I’ve finally admitted that studying maths is not going to happen for the foreseeable future, so I’ve been spending a little energy adjusting to that too. It was evident that it had become too much for me, but it was, to an extent, keeping my adrenaline levels up.

4. After months of really terrible eating patterns I’m making more effort to eat a bit better. I’m lucky enough to have a body that is remarkably tolerant of the problems my mind causes it, but I’m also aware that looking after it a bit is important.

5. I’m trying to sort out administration and paperwork and financial type stuff at the moment. Just because I’m falling apart and autistic and so on doesn’t mean that the electricity bills and so on stop. My husband is doing an amazing job caring for me, but he is only one person and I’m trying to contribute a bit to the running of our lives when I can.

6. My autism diagnosis is starting to sink in. I still need to go through my draft report thoroughly and get my follow up appointment arranged and think about the sort of support I need and so on. But, like giving up on the maths, the immediate and urgent need to produce evidence and the stress and adrenaline of pursuing the diagnostic process is over.

So, partly I’m trying to direct some of my attention elsewhere, but partly I’ve really seriously crashed energy wise. I tried to get up at 9 this morning, got as far as having a drink, then fell asleep on the sofa until midday. The months last autumn where I didn’t sleep at all are catching up with me now, the stress of the diagnostic process has left me exhausted, and I’m still considerably burnt out and trying to recover from what has evidently been an episode of severe autistic burnout. I currently need a lot of sleep, and even more rest, and as I’m using energy and executive functioning skills to try to eat regularly I have fewer resources available for turning on the computer and making blog posts.

I’m certain this is just another phase in the process, and the exhaustion is just something I have to deal with for now. My energy levels are very variable, and at the moment there’s nothing much I can do other than go with how things are and take the time I need to do the things that are most necessary.

I suspect this is all part of it. Discovering, in my mid-40s, that I am autistic is proving to be exciting, a relief, stressful, anxiety making, completely mind blowing, and, at the moment, utterly exhausting.

I’ll leave you with a few words (below, in bold) that I typed into the iPad the other day, but which I was too tired to turn into a blog post. Just the process of turning my thoughts into words is often hard enough, but then getting the right bits of computer and so on coordinated sometimes makes things impossible. Someone once suggested I should get an app for the blog – the thought of something so difficult (that sort of thing really is difficult for me) reduced me to tears – I’m sure my way of doing things is not the best, but the energy for learning something new simply isn’t there right now – new apps and things will have to wait until I’m better. My husband will testify that new computers and phones and so on have all led to meltdowns and tears and I resist technological change really strongly – even when it’s for the better – because it causes me such huge anxiety. I usually only change anything when I’m absolutely forced to!

I should add, however, that, just over three weeks after my diagnosis, I am continuing to feel a certain sort of “better”. I can already feel that although life will always be a struggle, there is an underlying mental wellness that I haven’t known for decades, if at all. And I now feel more confident in telling people that I am autistic and feel that I believe it myself much more. The process was difficult and exhausting, but, ultimately, for me, is already proving to be worth it. Accepting that I have a lifelong condition that will always limit me is not the easiest thing that I’ve ever had to do, but refusing to accept and embrace it won’t make it go away, it’ll just make my everyday life more difficult than it already is. It will take a while to work out exactly how best to live my life and to work out how to adapt it to make it as good as it can be, but having the formal diagnosis is already making that easier for me.

Yesterday,
I was out in town.
Conversation and coffee,
Socialising and shopping.

Not very much of the above,
Admittedly,
And nothing bad or especially
Difficult.

But enough
That

Today
I am quiet at home.
Tiredness and television,
Resting and recuperating.

Need so much of the above,
Always,
Even when I have had a
Good time.

Not energy
Even
To post this
On the blog.