Busy and Hot

When I woke for the first time today, at around four in the morning, I asked myself what I was going to do with the day. I had all sorts of plans in my head for things I might do, places I might go, what I might write. As it is, I eventually fell asleep again, and have now only just surfaced. It is nearly midday and I know that the plans I made in my head at four this morning are, on the whole, not going to happen.

And after a brief moment of beating myself up about it, I suddenly realised why I was so exhausted and why I haven’t written a blog post since Sunday and why I didn’t write the one I wanted to on Tuesday or the others that I still want to write (one in response to something) and why my admin is behind and I owe people messages and e-mails and so on – I have been busy!

The last two weekends I’ve been playing music. It’s been amazing and enjoyable, and brilliant to meet up with friends (old and new) and to play under a conductor who’s an absolute pleasure to work with. The concert was on Saturday night, so I was pretty wiped out on Sunday, but felt moved to write the rather rambling blog post on pride anyway. Monday I went for a short run, which, given my recent running activity, was a big deal. Tuesday I went to visit my best friend. Wednesday I went for a coffee then went to buy a few groceries.

And all this at temperatures above 30 degrees, which we’re really not used to round here, and which drain my energy rapidly. Furthermore, there is no airflow through our flat, so the only way to stop the hot air stagnating and to get any sort of breeze is to use fans. The noise of the fans is really not good for me and overloads me pretty much to the point of meltdown within a fairly short space of time.

Maybe, to most people, that level of activity and a bit of hot weather really wouldn’t be a big deal. When I think back to the “me” of the past, before two huge burnouts, before mental illness was even identified, that “me” would have looked at the “me” of now and thought myself utterly pathetic. I’d have been unable to comprehend why I couldn’t just get my act together and, with enough willpower, just get on with it.

Of course, the “me” of the past being like that, forcing myself to live that “normal” life for so long, doing what was expected of me and using vast amounts of energy and willpower to do so (largely because I assumed everyone else was doing the same), is a large part of what has caused me to have two major burnouts and to have arrived where I am now, with rather depleted functionality and very low energy levels.

Fortunately the “me” of now is starting to learn. And, a few minutes before writing this post, I realised not how LITTLE I’ve done over the last few days, but how MUCH I’ve actually done. And, I had, once again, to remind myself that my mind works a bit differently from most people’s and that I need more downtime, more space, and that things that come fairly easily to many folk, are actually rather challenging and energy consuming for me.

So the plans that I made at four this morning are now dropped, forgotten. Today I need to focus on self-care. I need to stay at home, even though the temperature in the flat is still 28.5 degrees and the place smells stagnant and nasty because neither of us has had the energy to do any serious cleaning and there’s no airflow because it’s so still. It’s not ideal, but it’s not a choice, because I need the solitude. I need not to go through the anxiety cycle of going out and working what to say to people and so on.

If, and only if, I have enough energy beyond that required for basic self care, I shall try to sort out the jobs lists and my diary, and sort out what I need to do, even if I don’t actually do it, but I expect it won’t get much further than that. As I’ve increased my levels of activity, and as I start to gain a bit of functionality as I emerge from burnout and from the whole “discovering I was autistic and getting diagnosed” thing and all the shock and relief and complete re-evaluation of my life, it’s tempting to think that I can just “go back to normal” without any consequences. But, of course, that isn’t the case.

And, interestingly, the blog post I wanted to write on Tuesday was the one outlining how I now am, four months after my diagnosis (it was the four month anniversary on Tuesday). And I’ve sort of gone and written it anyway – at my second follow up appointment it was noted that the increase in activity and my “recovery” carries a price, and that I need to remember that. This week that price has been that my head has become more and more muddled, I’ve struggled to hold conversations and to form words, I’ve struggled more with basic stuff at home, I’ve retreated once again into eating the same thing every day, and my decision-making capabilities have plummeted.

My level of satisfaction with life has also dropped – despite what might be perceived by someone from the outside (I’ve been seen playing music, going for a run, visiting a friend, and having a coffee) possibly indicating that I am happier with life and doing more “enjoyable” things, I’ve actually felt less happy, more frustrated, and generally more anxious. Yes, I’m really pleased that I got out to play in a superb concert and that I went for a run etc. because these are things I love doing, but they still drain my batteries, and a combination of the heat and trying to fit in other stuff has meant I haven’t been able to recharge properly.

Ironically, a viewer from outside who observed how little I’ve stimmed over the last few days might decide that it’s some sort of “improvement” and some sort of “your autism’s getting better” thing. In fact, the reverse is true. I desperately want to rock hard on the sofa for a bit, to wrap myself in compression, and to hide under my fleece blanket – these are all good and lovely things and part of how I cope with having to deal with the outside world. But I can’t cope with doing them at the moment because it is TOO HOT. So not only am I dealing with bad sensory stuff (noise of fans, feeling sweaty and nasty, smells stronger) because of the heat, I can’t mitigate with the good stuff.

So, in an odd way, I’ve looked more “normal” over the last few days, but the effect from inside is that I’m feeling increasingly dysfunctional and anxious and edgy and irritable. This “how autistic people look vs how they feel” thing is something I’m increasingly thinking about and want to write about some day, because I’m beginning to get the impression that the two are much more likely to be inversely than directly correlated.

In the meantime, I do observe that four months have passed since diagnosis, and that life is continuing to change. The people who wrote Tiny Glimmers back in January and Eight Weeks On back in April would have been amazed by what I have just written above and by what I’ve done in the last few weeks, so even where I’m still failing and still not achieving what I want to achieve (that will probably always be the case for me as my natural inclination is to constantly aim for more and to push to achieve goals and so on), I’m actually achieving much more than I was, which is, of course, progress.

But today “progress” will be achieved by resting and gentle tasks and self care, not by pushing on through. That way, I hope that I’ll be able to start to recharge my batteries enough to be able to do more running and music and socialising and to be able to think clearly enough to deal with admin and communication and to write more of the blog posts that I’d like to write!

A While, Maybe?

I’m still a bit behind with quite a lot of things, including stuff that I’d like to write here. Technically, today should be another rest day after the busy two-day weekend I’ve just had, especially as it’s the first time I’ve been out of the house for most of the day for two consecutive days in a very very long time. I’m also conscious that the weekend was preceded by a busy week and that my head isn’t working quite well enough to say what I want to say yet. The thought to word translation mechanism isn’t running smoothly – it feels as though it needs a drop of oil on the machinery or something.

It was an interesting weekend. Saturday I managed fairly well, although forming words became more and more difficult as the day went on, and by the end of the evening I was finding trying to translate my thoughts really laborious and hard work. Sunday morning was difficult – even my comfiest and loosest clothes felt scratchy and constraining, and I spent most of the day feeling gently nauseous. I never even attempted to remove my darkest sunglasses – even through them it was as though the brightness had been turned up to somewhere beyond maximum, and when I got home it felt as though my entire system was in overdrive. I rocked hard and bashed myself on the back of the sofa for a bit then fell asleep under my weighted blanket, which helped.

But it was a successful weekend. I managed to do approximately fourteen hours of orchestral rehearsal and concert, and both my playing and physical robustness were pretty reasonable. Not as good as they were in the past, but better than I expected in the current circumstances.

There were friends and allies there, including an old friend I hadn’t seen for years, and with whom it was good to re-establish contact. I wasn’t as social as I’d have been in the past, and not as much as I’d really like to be able to be for both networking and just getting to know folks purposes, but since I’m now officially socially inept rather than merely empirically so, I feel rather less guilty about going off on my own to eat lunch, taking a proper break from people now and again, and sitting in a corridor wearing ear defenders, rocking back and forth on my own. This is all OK now, and a great relief too.

I could easily have sat and sobbed about half way through Sunday afternoon, but didn’t. Having an explanation for why I feel so suddenly emotional about apparently nothing some of the time really does make it easier to deal with. Makes it easier to rationalise in my brain. It’s actually OK just to feel wrong sometimes, especially when I’ve been out in the world surrounded by people and noise and lights for hours on end. There’s a reason for it.

And years of musical training help – focus in on the playing, which is what I do, which is why I was there in the first place. In the same way as I went to the autism conference because of the intense interest and need to learn and pursue that interest, I keep returning to the world of orchestral and chamber music playing because I am driven there by that interest and the need to keep doing it and keep learning. Music is probably the longest lived “interest” I have and has persisted throughout my life, only vanishing when I’ve been severely depressed or deep in burnout. Trouble is, orchestras inevitably involve people – so I have to do quite a lot of work (being with people) in order to get access to the playing!!!

The aftermath of the weekend is interesting. I’m very tired. My word translation is off. I can feel myself struggling to say what I want even interacting online. I’m more triggered than usual by things – someone on facebook extolling the virtues of “cooking from scratch” made me really angry (I didn’t comment, just ranted at my husband a bit – he’s used to it). I drank rather more than I should have done last night. I’m still finding sounds too loud and lights too bright. And my executive functioning (ability to get my act together and do stuff) has taken something of a battering, as has my task initiating and switching ability.

None of this is surprising, given that I’d had an evening rehearsal the week before, then the final meeting with the autism assessment service, then stayed up all night watching the results of the General Election as they were announced, and then spent a weekend out in the world. Those things between them have used up nearly all my energy in the past week.

However, what’s different from how things have been for a long long time is that allowing the language system and functioning system and sensory system to decline, and just going with it now I know what’s happening, means that I am not ill after such activity as I would have been in the past. Not making myself chat to people at lunch breaks, spending time stimming quietly on my own, only making eye contact when absolutely necessary, not forcing words in order to “be polite”, and so on, all mean that I’m not feeling that awful “sick” feeling that I’m so familiar with to anything like the extent I would have done in the past. I probably appear slightly “odder” from the outside, but on the inside I’m actually calmer, and also, currently, considerably less depressed.

And I’m tired yes, but not quite so bone-numbingly exhausted as I might have been. Partly, I suspect this is because I’m continuing to recover from burnout, but even though I’m going out into a world that won’t always understand me or the way I work, the fact that I understand myself already removes a whole load of pressure, so this huge internal pressure I’ve always felt to “succeed” is now off.

I realise this is another rather erratic rambling blog post. And I’m still conscious that there are things that need sorting here. I’ve also been sporadic on the facebook page and not had much energy for twitter. I did manage to write one of the “poem things” after the first evening rehearsal though. At the time I didn’t manage to post it, so I’ll include it here.

The outside world,
Even when friendly
And something
I want to do,
Is sometimes
Utterly
Utterly
Exhausting.

Last night
I returned
To an evening rehearsal.
People
Noise
Lights
So. Much. Input.

This morning was spent
In bed.
Mostly asleep.

When I got up
And dressed
My clothes felt like
They were trying
To suffocate me.

It took many attempts
To write a Facebook status.
I have still failed to make
A cup of tea.
Even filling the kettle
Beyond me.

I don’t know how long
It will be before
I have enough energy
To post this
On the blog.

A while, maybe?

Six Months Public

I don’t have time to write a long blog post right now as today I’m going out into the world to play music, to continue the process of discovering just how much I can push myself to do things and what adaptions I might need in order to be able to live the best life I can, and to keep rebuilding my life, which fell apart so spectacularly in the latter part of 2016.

However, I wanted to post something, to mark the six month anniversary of publishing The Discovery, which was the post in which I disclosed my autistic identity to anyone who cared to read the post. Only two posts preceded it, an introduction, and a bit of background, and I could never have imagined, six months later, just how much I would have learnt and written and connected with other bloggers and people in the autistic community. On that day, back in December, I was, to put it mildly, extremely nervous about what might ensue, and I still, at that stage, had no idea that the responses from most people I know would mainly be of the form “Well, of course you’re autistic, you mean you didn’t know” or “Well that makes total sense”!!!

I wrote about Disclosing Identities back in January, and I stand by what I wrote then. For me, full disclosure has been relatively smooth, although I am still getting back out into the world (like today) and I am still working on getting a smooth and brief script together to talk about being autistic in ways that are most likely to be understood and appropriate when discussing with people out in the world. I’m also still very much at the start of the process of working out what adaptions I might need in order to successfully participate in various activities and not end up having a meltdown or ending up too ill to function.

But, six months on from what was the real start of this blog (and might, at the time, also have been the end of it), things are OK. I am yet to be told that I “can’t be autistic” (or any similar phrase) and I’m still wondering whether that’s because I do, in some ways, fulfil autistic stereotypes (I do rock back and forth quite a lot, I am fairly random with eye contact, I do sometimes have full-blown meltdowns in supermarkets, and, yes, I do like mathematics and find it calming), or whether I’ve just been monstrously lucky to be surrounded by such supportive people!

Whichever way, six months from the nervous day on which I posted that first post, life now feels very very different. Still very much a work in progress, but a long way from how it was back in December.

Energy Budgeting

I have a fairly busy week coming up. There are things in my diary that I’ve agreed to do that involve other people and are therefore “fixed” and would cause stress to me and others to cancel or change. There are also jobs that I really do need to do this week because not doing them would cause consequences (paying bills, dealing with various messages, making decisions about what to commit to over the next few months so other folk can plan, and that sort of thing). So I’m a bit stressed, and a bit anxious about how I’m going to cope with it all.

Part of what has happened over the last few weeks is that my state of “wellness” has shifted slightly. I’m far from “well” or able to live anything approaching what might be thought of as a “normal” life, but I’m no longer so ill that it’s obvious my life can only consist of getting out of bed, staring at the telly for a few hours, and then going back to bed again, which was how it was a few months ago. I can now manage to leave the flat on my own from time to time, even though it exhausts me, and, consequently, I’m doing rather more than I have been for many months.

But this increase in activity comes at a price. Each time I increase what I’m doing, a bit of functionality drops off somewhere else or I end up, on the days I’m not out in the world, back to being so ill that I can barely get out of bed. I managed to get to the conference the other week, and then to write it up as fully as I could, but the result was that I then spent two full days barely able to do anything and retreated back under my blanket on the sofa, stimming almost constantly, and not really managing to eat properly. You might have noticed that, as I’ve been doing more I’ve been blogging less. I only have so much energy and cannot use it everywhere at once.

And so I need to budget my energy. If I’m going to have enough energy to do the things I want to do in life (or, at least, as many of them as possible – I’d really have liked a full-time job and a family and to have been able to have a hobby or so on top of that, but I’m realistic to know that, for me, those things simply aren’t possible), then I’m going to have to save my energy rather carefully and work out what things drain my energy and what things give me energy, and how I can balance the two.

Which is, of course, why, stupidly, I’m up and out of bed before 10 in the morning this morning, too much in my head to go back to sleep, and now sitting at the computer writing a blog post about it!!!

The irony is not lost on me that I’ve woken up this morning feeling not too bad and am struggling to rest in the way that I know I should be doing if I’m to get through the rest of the week without falling apart. I’m just hoping that I can get the important jobs like bill paying done today so that at least I can allow myself to crash out later in the week if I need to, and I can spend all available energy dealing with the inevitable anxiety that seeing people (some of them new) and going to places (at least one of them unfamiliar) later in the week will inevitably cause.

It’s also particularly difficult to budget my energy at the moment because I don’t actually know how much energy I have to start with. In terms of spoon theory, I’m currently being given a number of spoons at the start of each day but I don’t know how many there are (I’m sure others with variable conditions will relate strongly to this feeling). In terms of monetary budgeting, it’s like working with a bank account without a balance available – I might have enough in there to go on a spending spree and buy whatever I like today, or I might go out and try to buy essential food and not have enough to pay for it. I simply don’t know, so it all feels like a bit of a guessing game right now and all I can do is keep trying to find out where my limits are.

What I do now know is that the only way to manage these energy levels is to let them settle as I stabilise after burnout, to work out just how much functionality I have in what areas, and then to start to look at how I can optimise life in general to be as good as it can be. I’m still accepting that it’s never going to be the sort of life I anticipated it would be when I was in my late teens and early twenties, nor the life that many other people expected me to have at that time. I’m still trying to figure out what I can do and get to a point where there is some sort of stability in my life. Currently, it all feels rather unknown and rather challenging and rather uncertain.

I could, of course, decline the offers to meet people, to play music, and to go out to dinner. I could give up the idea of ever running in big races. I could abandon plans to continue studying and learning. And I could decide to spend the rest of my life watching daytime TV, scrolling through social media, and playing with the animals. It became evident years ago that I can’t hold down a life-sustaining job for any length of time and I am not able to live independently. It also became apparent some years ago that having a family wasn’t going to be in my list of options either.

However, I’m interested enough in things that I don’t want to abandon all my goals and I do want to get back out into the world as much as I can. But, unlike in the past, I now have knowledge that makes me experience almost everything in life very very differently. I feel like I almost went into hibernation back in September 2016, and I’ve spent months, mainly hidden away in the flat, exploring my real identity, finding autistic communities online, learning the language of the autistic world, discovering things about my past, learning to listen to my body, having hundreds of “lightbulb moments” where I suddenly realise that there’s something ELSE I have always done because I’m autistic, and also allowing myself time and space to come to terms with what has happened and to recover from the huge burnout that had been building for some time.

But getting back out into the world uses energy. It uses energy in unexpected ways. Every time somebody asks me the question “What do you do?” it saps my energy levels massively because I have no simple answer and have not yet developed a reliable script. Every time people expect me to have “normal” social skills, or to chat in a group, or to be able to process the sheer amount of speech in the world, I get exhausted. Every time I have to explain because I’m meeting people who don’t know me online and don’t read my blog, it’s knackering. Every time I hear someone using person first language or functioning labels and so on I want to scream at them, I want to make them understand, but that all uses energy – things that are taken for granted in autistic communities online are totally foreign to most people in the outside world and, as is so often the case, the only way to deal with it is self-advocacy (ironically, I have a communication disability but in order to get my needs met in the outside world I have to be able to communicate effectively in a way that is exhausting and difficult to me)!!!

None of this surprises me, of course. Some of it I’ve known for years, and some of it is very easy to deduce when I think back to a year ago when I’d never heard of “burnout”, “stimming”, “inertia” and so on (I promise I’ll write proper blog posts explaining terminology at some point – it’s something I really want to do, but I can only process all these things at a certain pace and I can’t do everything at once). I know that there’s no reason why most people would have the faintest clue of what it’s like to experience the world as I do (and, of course, it turns out that I don’t know what it’s like to experience the world as they do either) and I’m now having to work out the interface between me, now unmasked, totally public and “out” and determined to be as authentically autistic as possible, and the world outside that won’t always totally understand me.

And it all uses energy. Lots of energy. And I don’t know whether I even have that much energy much of the time. But, ten months after discovering it was very likely I was autistic, six months after the low point of the aftermath of the first assessment going so badly wrong, and nearly four months after diagnosis, I’m starting to gather just enough energy together to do a few “normal” things out in the world. And since I’m no longer masking, or pretending, I’m hoping that I’ll gain quite a lot of energy from that – enough to compensate for the energy I’ll use doing all the necessary explaining.

So energy budgeting is very much something I’m thinking about at the moment. I’m starting to gather resources, starting to think about how I could make a system that will work for me (much like my old “mood diary” did so effectively in managing my bipolar disorder) in monitoring things, and what some of my goals for the future are going to be. Since I now know I have quite substantial limitations on what I can do because my neurodivergent brain needs so much energy to process “ordinary” things, I’m going to have to choose my goals and activities quite carefully!

This still feels like very very early days. There is still a long way to go. But it’s a start!

Works In Progress

I’m aware that blog posts have been a little erratic of late, and it might seem that I’m doing less writing or losing interest. In fact, that’s not the case at all, and what’s actually happening at the moment is that I’m trying to work on a couple of projects, both of which will probably extend to multiple blog posts, and both of which I really want to get right and be as accurate and clear as possible, since both are important for different reasons.

One is the story of my final autism assessment, the one where I received my diagnosis. I’ve started work on this, but remembering back and trying to write exactly what I want about it is taking quite a lot of energy and is quite hard work, so it’s not happening overnight. It’s more of an “end of term assignment” than “this week’s homework”. It might take another week or so for me to complete this project.

The other is a write up of what happened on Tuesday of this week when I attended the National Autistic Society’s conference on Autism and Mental Health. I’m trying to write up the experience and what I learnt (I took 11 pages of notes), and my thoughts on the day as a whole. There are many of these thoughts and sorting them all out into presentable form will take a while. I’m currently working on them as fast as I can.

Furthermore, as is obvious from the preceding paragraph, I’ve actually been out in the world again doing things quite a lot recently. I’ve been to the conference, met up with a new friend, played quite a lot of music, and am also meeting up with old friends over the coming weekend. Furthermore, I’m starting to organize my life and plan for the future a bit too and have started thinking about goals and plans for the next few years in a way that I haven’t done for a very long time. Most of these things are taking a massive amount of social, sensory, and executive functioning energy and I’m needing to undertake a certain amount of self care (downtime in between, remembering to eat, etc) in order to cope with my increased activity levels while still continuing to recover from burnout. It’s a tricky balance to achieve.

So I’m still here, still working on these things, and still trying to do a good job of giving information and my viewpoint and doing so as clearly as possible. I’m still also working on tidying up this blog and making a complete list of posts and so on, but all this will take a little time, even though I’m very very determined. I’m doing, as I always do, my absolute best with it all.

But I’m only one human with a rather erratic mind, and I’m acutely aware that I need to protect my mental health so I don’t relapse, so it might take a few days for me to catch up on everything I’d like to say.

I’ll get there!

Hand Flapping

I wrote the words below (in italics) around eight months ago – before diagnosis, before forms, before I had any interaction with autistic communities online, right back in the early days of the “autism hypothesis” as I was then calling it. At that time I’d only just contacted my mother to start to ask about my early childhood, I’d heard the word “stimming” but didn’t really understand it, and I had no knowledge of autistic burnout or realization that I was experiencing it and had done so before.

I was yet even to receive the forms from the triage service or do any autism “tests” beyond the online one that I mentioned in The Discovery. I was still only just acknowledging that I even WAS autistic, and at that point I was only talking to a very small number of people about it and really only had Google and a couple of books to help me.

At the time I wrote the words I remember being really freaked out by them, even though I’d felt the need to write them. The whole concept of “just letting stuff happen” was so alien to me, having spent my entire life fighting to be “in control” and I was right at the start of the process of discovery. I had only just, a few days earlier, typed the words “I am autistic” for the first time and they still felt very foreign and strange and the whole notion of me being autistic seemed seriously wild – I didn’t spend a few years wondering or suspecting that I might be, as some people do – I’d gone from completely clueless to almost certainly autistic in the space of only a few weeks and my head was still reeling from the experience.

I didn’t even initially discuss them with either my husband or the friend with whom I was most closely corresponding about the possibility that I was autistic. I remember sending a rather coy facebook message to that friend saying I’d discovered something, but, initially it seemed too radical to say what – I’ve come a long way from then to now and my perceptions and levels of confidence have changed so much that I’m now publishing the words, which I couldn’t even send to my friend back then, openly on the internet!!!

But right from the off I knew I wanted to investigate the whole thing thoroughly. I wanted to experiment, to find out just what was going on. It was already obvious that the jiggly leg and the constant sitting with my legs folded under me and the gentle rocking and so on were likely autistic things and so I deliberately set out to learn to listen to my body and to what it wanted to do and to allow myself to experiment to see what happened.

Had I grown up knowing I was autistic and been part of any autistic community, this stuff might have been so commonplace in my life that it wouldn’t even have featured as a “thing to discover” but to me it felt new and big and important. I remember, much later, reading an account from another late diagnosed person saying it took them 6 months from diagnosis to reach that particular point. It took me only a few days from the point that I started to accept that I was autistic!

But I was deliberately experimenting. I am also pretty lucky in that I’m not the sort of person who feels shame about lots of stuff – I don’t have a deeply ingrained sense of “this is wrong” because I’ve always lived a somewhat random life, rather a long way from the middle of the “bell curve”! I knew by my teens that I was never going to be one of the popular “normal” ones and there’s no doubt that as I’ve got older I’ve increasingly adopted an attitude of “if they don’t like me as I am then I’ll just move on and not bother about it”. I have plenty of folk who do seem to be amused or entertained by me enough to stick around and whom I find interesting to be with so it’s not a big problem.

But, internally, this was for me, a big milestone, a big thing for me consciously to rediscover. And I remember, having typed the words “my autistic body” (perhaps an odd thing to type but it was what it was) looking at them with a mix of utter “this is so freaky and odd and new and scary and but ME?” and total “this is so comforting and reassuring and exciting and wow can this really be true” all at the same time.

September 2016

So, I’m staying overnight at my friend’s. I wake. It is 4 in the morning. When I wake I am overwhelmed with anxiety. Understandable. I’m away from home. I had orchestra. People. I talked a lot about autism to my friend yesterday afternoon and evening. My life is in such a period of upheaval and learning and turmoil. The revelations about my 4 year old self are still shocking me and rebounding inside my head.

I feel sick. Really really sick. I have felt this way here before. I have usually put it down to a large meal in college or too much alcohol. Neither of those is true for last night. A fairly small supper (I have learnt to eat small when things are unfamiliar because I know being out of normal routine is often stressful and makes me feel anxious and sick, so less food offsets the feeling).

Usually at this point I would try to keep calm and lie still. Breathing exercises. Mindfulness. Sometimes it works. But often I cannot get calm. The sick feeling rises. As I am emetophobic I get into a feedback loop. Sometimes I manage to fend it off but spend the next hour or so lying there feeling shaky and drained. Sometimes the worst happens. I end up in the bathroom and return, tearful and traumatised, to bed, where I might then drift into a troubled sleep, but the experience stays with me unless I spend the next few days working on blocking it from my mind.

Since it became apparent that I am autistic (there, I said it again) I have been experimenting. I have never known why I sit on the sofa at home and gently rock, but I do. It is calming. Maybe there is more in me. Something else. More long-repressed behaviours. I know I always fiddle with things. My hair. Pens. Cords. But maybe there are other things that are part of me that I am yet to discover.

I lie in the bed and decide to try something. To stop trying any sort of control over my body and mind and see what happens. My body starts to move. Rhythmically rocking backwards and forwards. It feels right. Then the strangest thing happens. I want to flap my hands. Really really want to. My arms emerge from under the covers. My hands begin to flap, fast, furious. I don’t know for how long, but the nausea and sick feeling subsides. I calm. Tears run down my face. I know I am going to be OK now. I flap a bit more, just to check. But I am calmer. The anxiety is reduced. I finally lie still.

I have heard mention of hand flapping. Has that found its way into my mind. Am I “trying” to be autistic, to prove something to myself? Au contraire, I was actually not trying to do anything except what my body felt it wanted to do. It felt natural. Normal. Although massively at odds with everything I have learnt from society over the last 45 years.

I wonder if my particular flapping is an autistic thing. So I grab my phone and Google autism hand flapping. My phone knows how to spell autism these days. I find a video of a man demonstrating flapping behaviour. It looks right. I read on a website that autistic children flap their hands and adults may go back to the behaviour as a way of relieving stress and anxiety. I don’t know if I am going back because I don’t know if I ever did as a child. Maybe so, but if that was the case I was almost certainly told to stop. Suppress. Do not exhibit abnormal behaviour. Nobody would have known back then what it meant.

I am slightly creeped out by the experience. The sense of calm the flapping induced was profound and remarkably quick. It clearly stimulated something that stopped the sick feeling, stopped the acute anxiety and stress. I feel very strange about this. I know it is an odd behaviour. Not something I have done in this way before. It was what my body wanted to do. And it worked.

I wonder what will happen over the coming weeks. As I come to terms with my autism what else will be revealed? I find the term “stimming” strange and unfamiliar. It was not a term I knew until very recently. Again, I worry that I am making myself autistic to fit the model. But every time I return to the fact that I have been autistic all along. It is not that I fit the model. It is that the model fits me. That I have found myself. Discovered needs in myself that were hitherto hidden. Years of lying in unfamiliar beds at night feeling sick. And I didn’t have a way of dealing with it. Now I do. That was what my body wanted. So that’s what I did. My autistic body. My differently wired head. My new life. My new start.

I am 45 years old and I am at the very beginning of my journey of learning to live like me. I have had fleeting moments, over the past week, where I have thought “when will life return to normal”. I know that old normal will never return. Yes, there is a part of me that is deeply unnerved by this whole autistic world. It’s so new. It has all happened so fast. Where is my old familiar life?

The old life is gone. I would not want it back.

***

Two Days Later

I have become a hand flapper. It has become important to me. I also like to rock, and to do things with my fingers, waggle my feet, bash my legs against the sofa back, and, of course, allow my leg to jiggle, rather than making the effort to stop what is often involuntary movement.

I was flapping tonight. Not because I was feeling particularly bad, but just to keep myself calm and to explore further the effect it has on me. I flapped for slightly longer than before. I felt a feeling in my fingers that was familiar, and pleasurable, and special. And it triggered a memory from long ago, very long ago, of the same feeling and I realised:

I. Have. Done. This. Before.

The realisation hits me. I did this as a child. I wonder why I stopped. Did someone tell me to stop waving my arms around? Did I gain awareness that other people didn’t flap their hands and as I was learning how to live by copying and observing I stopped? Did some kid at school bully me for it?

I wonder when it was. But I know now that I flapped my hands as a child.

Mind continues to be blown by all this stuff.

Breathe for goodness sake, breathe!

It turned out that I hadn’t just been flapping my hands when I was younger. As soon as I started to relax about it and consciously allow myself flap in front of my husband he said “Oh, you’ve always done that – though not quite as obviously as now”. Things I’ve always done with fingers and wrists when trying to make decisions or when stressed turn out all to be part of the same thing, but just on a smaller scale. I’ve since discovered that there are all sorts of times when I flap my hands, and these days I often hardly notice. Sometimes it’s when I’m happy about something, sometimes it’s for anxiety relief. These days I generally just go with it!

And, like so many autistic things, it possibly looks a little unusual from the outside. My husband (who also flaps his hands from time to time) frequently tells me I look like a T-Rex (I’m totally cool with that – I was a mad dinosaur fan as a kid and am still somewhat interested in them), and I suspect that some folk might find it a bit odd, but from the inside it’s just a natural form of expression and something that’s now very much part of my life.

The only thing I do have to make myself consciously remember from time to time is not to flap my hands while I’m holding a drink – that doesn’t work out well!!!

Good, Bad, Random!

It’s as if my head is desperately trying to prove just how true the oscillation theory actually is. Thinking back over the last few days:

Saturday – was a fairly good day. I knew I was a bit on edge, but still managed to get out and about to visit my best friend then to meet my husband for coffee. I was tired, and very much in need of time in the dark under my weighted blanket, but I was OK.

Sunday – was a bad day. I felt distracted and ill-at-ease all day. I achieved very little aside from watching multiple episodes of Columbo, a James Bond film, and The Terminal. I spent a lot of time under my blanket on the sofa, stimming in one way or another almost constantly.

Monday – I wrote the post about the oscillations. I then went out for my first proper run in months, just a single kilometre, but such a massive achievement from where I was. I came home and updated my calendar and replied to a few e-mails and had a generally good and productive evening.

Tuesday – was a terrible day. The neighbours were doing some DIY in the next room (we live in a flat) and were banging and drilling and scraping all day. I tried earplugs, headphones, ear defenders, but the feeling of all of them touching my ears was worse than the noise. By 4 in the afternoon I was a mess, my sensory system totally overwhelmed by the noise and feeling of closeness of the neighbours, and my brain seeming to be doing somersaults inside my head. It wasn’t good.

And I reacted in one of my more maladaptive ways to feeling so terrible – having hardly eaten anything all day I decided to have an early glass of wine, which led, eventually, to, well, rather more glasses of wine, and then even more, stronger, cheaper, wine… (you get the picture). I probably made a total arse of myself on facebook, but I did survive some fairly dark thoughts, so for that we must be thankful I guess!

It was also one of those days where I couldn’t write coherently. I find those days incredibly frustrating – when my head is full of thoughts and I can’t turn them into any sort of useable form. I started 4 blog posts / poems. Only one of them makes even vague sense, and it’s not exactly fun stuff for parties. I have a small collection of the darker stuff that I’ll perhaps try to sort out when I have enough energy to do it, but I’ll have to be in the right frame of mind for that.

So, ironically, just as I posted the post about oscillating, the last few days have been a microcosm of my life over the last 9 months or so. Good – bad – good – bad, and now, we’re back to good!

Today I feel much better. My head is clearer, I’m making myself eat food and drink sensible things like water and milk and tea, and I’ve washed my hair and checked that I’m wearing trousers without holes in in anticipation of spending the early evening at a “poetry and mental health” event which my husband is organizing. Also, the neighbours are quiet today, which helps immensely.

There are still unfinished blog posts in my folder, and there are still things I’d really like to be doing from the jobs list, but at the moment I’m happy to take whatever progress I can get. On days like this, when I feel somewhat inadequate that I haven’t yet written something really helpful (this blog is such a strange mixture of articles, journal entries, personal accounts, memories, random poems and so on), I can remind myself that I’ve only been doing this for a few months and although I really want to produce helpful material and a beautifully crafted set of posts, I also started this blog as an outlet for my thoughts, since I have no therapist nor much else beyond an exceedingly tolerant husband, one or two real-life friends, and those with whom I’m connected on social media.

I’m also really still getting used to the idea that I am autistic, I’m still working out how to interact with people out in the world in a way that is both possible, so that I can do the things I want to do, but will not break me as badly as it has done in the past. This is the start of the process, a time of experimentation and working out how to live my new life as an openly autistic person. I keep expecting myself to have all the answers, but I forget that I’m still very much at the start of this whole thing and it will take time before I can be where I want to be, both as far as being any sort of autistic advocate or gaining as much knowledge about autism as I want to, and simply being able to live some sort of life that works for me and I can cope with.

And I’m trying to resume bits of my old life too – playing music, running, studying, maths and science, a bit more attention for the animals, participating in events, seeing friends, even sorting out the chaos that is our flat, and so on. But I know that I have to tame my natural instincts, which are to plunge headlong into absolutely everything the minute that I have the slightest bit of energy (though that taming really doesn’t come naturally).

And to round off this somewhat random and oscillatory blog post, I’ve just looked at the date on my clock and noticed that it is exactly five months ago today that I published The Discovery and announced publicly that I am autistic, having spent the preceding four months getting my own head round the idea and discussing it only with a very few people. It was an interesting day, and the reactions from people who knew me were interesting too.

I’ve come a very long way since then. Things that seemed really wild just a few months ago seem to be such an established part of my life now. Life really has changed a lot.

And, on balance, it’s changed for the better!